Close
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters
Aryeh Shmuelevitz study of Ottoman Jewish history takes the reader across the Ottoman Empire in time and geography while questioning the historical value of each source he consults.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-126-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 28,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 103
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-126-1
$115.00
$69.00

This work brings together Professor Aryeh Shmuelevitz’s work on Ottoman Jewry into a single volume. The essays deal with a variety of Hebrew and Ottoman sources: Responsa (questions on religious law answered by rabbis); chronicles by Jewish historians; the Jewish press; Ottoman taxation records; and local archives. The sources consulted by Shmuelevitz offer insight into not only the Ottoman Jewish communities but also their relations with their Muslim and Christian neighbours. Shmuelevitz begins by addressing the question of the reliability of the sources, before moving into specific case studies such as the Jews of Cairo, Greece and Palestine or Jewish-Armenian relations in the Ottoman Empire. The careful consideration the sources being used and their placement in the historical context makes the approach of this volume valuable to students of Ottoman and Jewish history.

This work brings together Professor Aryeh Shmuelevitz’s work on Ottoman Jewry into a single volume. The essays deal with a variety of Hebrew and Ottoman sources: Responsa (questions on religious law answered by rabbis); chronicles by Jewish historians; the Jewish press; Ottoman taxation records; and local archives. The sources consulted by Shmuelevitz offer insight into not only the Ottoman Jewish communities but also their relations with their Muslim and Christian neighbours. Shmuelevitz begins by addressing the question of the reliability of the sources, before moving into specific case studies such as the Jews of Cairo, Greece and Palestine or Jewish-Armenian relations in the Ottoman Empire. The careful consideration the sources being used and their placement in the historical context makes the approach of this volume valuable to students of Ottoman and Jewish history.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor

Aryeh Shmuelevitz

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS (page 7)
  • INTRODUCTION (page 9)
  • THE RESPONSA AS A SOURCE FOR THE HISTORY OF THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE (page 21)
  • CAPSALI AS A SOURCE FOR OTTOMAN HISTORY,1450-1523 (page 31)
  • THE JEWS IN CAIRO AT THE TIME OF THE OTTOMAN CONQUEST:THE ACCOUNT OF CAPSALI (page 39)
  • JEWISH SOURCES FOR THE HISTORY AND SOCIETY OF GREECE AND ITS JEWISH COMMUNITIES IN THE 15TH AND 16TH CENTURIES (page 45)
  • THE BATTLE OF KHAN YUNIS DECEMBER 1516 (page 51)
  • MS POCOCKE NO.31 AS A SOURCE FOR THE EVENTS IN ISTANBUL IN THE YEARS 1622-1624 (page 57)
  • TWO HEBREW-LANGUAGE WEEKLIES IN TURKEY: AN APPEAL TO REVIVE CONCEPT OF A NATIONAL CULTURE (page 75)
  • RELATIONS BETWEEN JEWS AND CHRISTIANS IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE:THE ARMENIAN CASE (page 85)
  • THE OTTOMAN CITY IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY - ASPECTS OF TAXATION AS REFELCTED IN JEWISH AND OTTOMAN SOURCES (page 91)
  • THE ARCHIVES OF TEL-AVIV-JAFFA AS A SOURCE FOR THE FINAL YEARS OF THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE IN PALESTINE (page 95)