Search
Filters

Proclus on the transition from metaphysical being to natural becoming


A new reading of the Platonic theory of Forms


This volume examines the historical end of the Platonic tradition in relation to creation theories of the natural world through Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus (412-485) elaboration of an investigation of Plato’s theory of metaphysical archetypal Forms.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0692-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 3,2017
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 176
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0692-5
$99.00
$59.40

This volume examines the historical end of the Platonic tradition in relation to creation theories of the natural world through the Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus' (412-485) elaboration of an investigation of Plato’s theory of metaphysical archetypal Forms.

Proclus proceeds to a systematic construction of this theory and grounds it in ontological monism. He presents the Forms as constructing, through their combinations, the presuppositions for the creation of the natural world, in such a way that it functions in an orderly and harmonious way, showing the natural world is not produced by chance or means of automatizations, but on the basis of a teleological planning. This volume also reflects Proclus’ dealing with the topics of objective reality and the nature of the “universals”.

This volume examines the historical end of the Platonic tradition in relation to creation theories of the natural world through the Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus' (412-485) elaboration of an investigation of Plato’s theory of metaphysical archetypal Forms.

Proclus proceeds to a systematic construction of this theory and grounds it in ontological monism. He presents the Forms as constructing, through their combinations, the presuppositions for the creation of the natural world, in such a way that it functions in an orderly and harmonious way, showing the natural world is not produced by chance or means of automatizations, but on the basis of a teleological planning. This volume also reflects Proclus’ dealing with the topics of objective reality and the nature of the “universals”.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor Biography

Elias Tempelis

Dr Elias Tempelis studied Philosophy at the Universities of Athens and London and is Associate Professor of Greek Philosophy at the Hellenic Naval Academy. His doctoral dissertation is about knowledge of the divine according to the School of Ammonius. His postdoctoral research is about the metaphysics of the Neoplatonist philosophers Syrianus and Asclepius. Byzantine and Modern Greek Philosophy are also included among his interests. He has participated in many conferences and research projects in Greece and abroad.

Christos Terezis

Christos Terezis is Professor of Ancient Greek and Byzantine Philosophy at the Department of Philosophy in University of Patras, Greece.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Globalization and Economic Justice

From Terrorism to Global Peace
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0735-9
A collection of articles dedicated to raising global awareness and the restraining of growing injustice, while supporting the building up of a community that guarantees basic rights in a democratic society.
$45.00

Hippolytus of Rome: Commentary on Daniel and 'Chronicon'

Commentary on Daniel and 'Chronicon'
By T. C. Schmidt; Contribution by Nick Nicholas
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0658-1
This volume contains an English translation and introduction to Hippolytus of Rome's Commentary on Daniel and his Chronicon. Both works are the first writings of their kind. The commentary is the earliest extant Christian commentary on a book of the Bible and the Chronicon is the first extant Christian historical work.
$57.00

Lactantius the Theologian

Lactantius and the Doctrine of Providence
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0723-6
This book examines the doctrine of providence as it appears in the works of the North African Latin apologist, L. Caecilius Firmianus Lactantius.
$72.00

Divine and Human Hate in the Ancient Near East: A Lexical and Contextual Analysis

A Lexical and Contextual Analysis
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0695-6
Divine and Human Hate in the Ancient Near East studies lexemes for ‘hate’ in Biblical Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Akkadian. Riley conducts a lexical study of three ‘hate’ terms, along with comparative analysis of divine and human hate in biblical, Ugaritic, and Mesopotamian literature.
$59.40