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Root-Determinatives in Semitic Speech


A Contribution to Semitic Philology


Suggesting that the Semitic root may be, at least subconsciously, biliteral, Hurwitz launches into a study of this phenomenon. Discussing linguistic phenomena such as pluriliteral forms, root-differentiation, and folk-etymologies, this little study covers significant ground for understanding the underlying structure of biblical Hebrew.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-627-1
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 33
Publication Date: Jul 2,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 135
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-627-1
$62.00
$37.20

Beginning with a trend noticed by many students of classical Hebrew, Hurwitz takes as his starting point the idea that roots in biblical Hebrew may in fact have a biliteral basis. The student of Semitic languages initiated into the triliteral Hebrew root system may find this concept shocking, but, as Hurwitz points out, it is an old idea. Suggesting that perhaps the biliteral root is a subconscious phenomenon, Hurwitz takes a careful look at root-differentiation and folk-etymologies as found in the Bible. Pluriliteral forms are subjected next to his analysis and a resulting theory emerges. Linguistic features such as stative, intensive, purposive, causative, and reflexive stems are presented as examples of primitive Semitic stem formations. Hurwitz concludes his study with a summary as well as a useful index of roots.

Solomon Theodore Halévy Hurwitz (1886-1920) earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University. He continued to live in New York and published articles on items of Jewish interest.

Beginning with a trend noticed by many students of classical Hebrew, Hurwitz takes as his starting point the idea that roots in biblical Hebrew may in fact have a biliteral basis. The student of Semitic languages initiated into the triliteral Hebrew root system may find this concept shocking, but, as Hurwitz points out, it is an old idea. Suggesting that perhaps the biliteral root is a subconscious phenomenon, Hurwitz takes a careful look at root-differentiation and folk-etymologies as found in the Bible. Pluriliteral forms are subjected next to his analysis and a resulting theory emerges. Linguistic features such as stative, intensive, purposive, causative, and reflexive stems are presented as examples of primitive Semitic stem formations. Hurwitz concludes his study with a summary as well as a useful index of roots.

Solomon Theodore Halévy Hurwitz (1886-1920) earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University. He continued to live in New York and published articles on items of Jewish interest.

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Contributor

Solomon Hurwitz

  • NOTE (page 5)
  • PREFACE (page 9)
  • CONTENTS (page 13)
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY (page 15)
  • CHAPTER I: THE SUBCONSCIOUS BILITERAL ROOT (page 23)
  • CHAPTER II: A STUDY OF PLURILITERALS AND THE RESULTING THEORY (page 59)
  • CHAPTER III: EXAMPLES OF PRIMITIVE SEMITIC STEM-FORMATIONS (page 96)
  • CHAPTER IV: SUMMARY OF RESULTS (page 129)
  • INDEX OF ROOTS (page 133)