You have no items in your shopping cart.
Close
Search
Filters

Studies in the Peshitta of Kings

The Transmission and Revision of the Text, Relations with other Texts, and Translation Features


This monograph examines the manuscript variants of the Peshitta (the standard Syriac translation) of Kings, with special attention to the manuscript 9a1. Manuscript 9a1 is of critical importance for the textual history of Kings, and Walter argues that there is overwhelming evidence that the non-9a1 Mss attest to an extensive revision. This monograph also discusses translation features of the Peshitta of Kings with special attention paid to harmonization and the leveling and dissimulation of vocabulary. Walter also treats the vorlage for the translation and treats its relation to the LXX and the Targumim.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-853-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Feb 19,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 8.25 x 10.75
Page Count: 188
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-853-4
$130.00
Your price: $91.00

This monograph dealing with 1 and 2 Kings was prepared at the invitation of Piet Dirksen when he was the editor-in-chief at the Peshitta Institute, Leiden.

The first part is primarily devoted to a detailed examination of the manuscript variants of the Peshitta (the standard Syriac translation) of Kings, with special attention to the manuscript 9a1. The alternative approaches to mss like 9a1, which in some OT books frequently have readings which reflect the Masoretic Text, are introduced. The study of the unique readings of 9a1 provides massive evidence that in Kings it commonly preserves the original Peshitta, although there is also evidence that 9a1 in Kings and other books has had its own independent history of deviating from the original translation.

A study of the shared variants also confirms the special status of 9a1 in preserving readings which agree with MT. A number of quantitative statistical techniques were used including Pool Tests and Multi-dimensional Scaling in the analysis of the data. Not only is the importance of 9a1 for the textual history of Kings established, but overwhelming evidence is found that the non-9a1 mss are ultimately shaped by an extensive intentional revision – a phenomena also found in a much lesser degree in Jeremiah, and sporadically in other books.

Since Kings overlaps extensive portions of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Chronicles, a chapter deals with them. The original translation is shown to have used the text of Isaiah, almost assuredly the Peshitta rather than the Hebrew of Isaiah. The revision represented by the non-9a1 mss also has made extensive deliberate use of the Peshitta of Isaiah and also the Peshitta of Jeremiah.

The second part of the monograph presents the results of Walter’s doctoral dissertation on 2 Kings, updated on the basis of the analysis of part 1. The question of the Hebrew text used and the rendering of names are treated. Translation features are examined with special attention to harmonization and the leveling and dissimulation of vocabulary, and to exegetical and theological changes. These features of the original translation were carried further in the revision identified in part 1, and presumably were intended to provide an improved Syriac translation, although there is no evidence of the use of the Hebrew text after the original translation. The possible influence of the LXX, and especially the Lucianic recension, is considered occasionally relevant, although not in places which may have provided translation problems. Any relations to the renderings of the Targum are best explained in terms of similarity of the languages.

After completing his doctoral dissertation under Charles T. Fritsch, James Barr, and Philip C. Hammond, Dr. Donald M. Walter became the editor of Psalms and later Jeremiah for the Peshitta Institute’s critical edition of the OT. He has served as an editor of Vol. 1 of the Concordance to the Torah also issued by the Institute, and is currently the first translator for Kings of the Institute’s Edessa Bible.

This monograph dealing with 1 and 2 Kings was prepared at the invitation of Piet Dirksen when he was the editor-in-chief at the Peshitta Institute, Leiden.

The first part is primarily devoted to a detailed examination of the manuscript variants of the Peshitta (the standard Syriac translation) of Kings, with special attention to the manuscript 9a1. The alternative approaches to mss like 9a1, which in some OT books frequently have readings which reflect the Masoretic Text, are introduced. The study of the unique readings of 9a1 provides massive evidence that in Kings it commonly preserves the original Peshitta, although there is also evidence that 9a1 in Kings and other books has had its own independent history of deviating from the original translation.

A study of the shared variants also confirms the special status of 9a1 in preserving readings which agree with MT. A number of quantitative statistical techniques were used including Pool Tests and Multi-dimensional Scaling in the analysis of the data. Not only is the importance of 9a1 for the textual history of Kings established, but overwhelming evidence is found that the non-9a1 mss are ultimately shaped by an extensive intentional revision – a phenomena also found in a much lesser degree in Jeremiah, and sporadically in other books.

Since Kings overlaps extensive portions of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Chronicles, a chapter deals with them. The original translation is shown to have used the text of Isaiah, almost assuredly the Peshitta rather than the Hebrew of Isaiah. The revision represented by the non-9a1 mss also has made extensive deliberate use of the Peshitta of Isaiah and also the Peshitta of Jeremiah.

The second part of the monograph presents the results of Walter’s doctoral dissertation on 2 Kings, updated on the basis of the analysis of part 1. The question of the Hebrew text used and the rendering of names are treated. Translation features are examined with special attention to harmonization and the leveling and dissimulation of vocabulary, and to exegetical and theological changes. These features of the original translation were carried further in the revision identified in part 1, and presumably were intended to provide an improved Syriac translation, although there is no evidence of the use of the Hebrew text after the original translation. The possible influence of the LXX, and especially the Lucianic recension, is considered occasionally relevant, although not in places which may have provided translation problems. Any relations to the renderings of the Targum are best explained in terms of similarity of the languages.

After completing his doctoral dissertation under Charles T. Fritsch, James Barr, and Philip C. Hammond, Dr. Donald M. Walter became the editor of Psalms and later Jeremiah for the Peshitta Institute’s critical edition of the OT. He has served as an editor of Vol. 1 of the Concordance to the Torah also issued by the Institute, and is currently the first translator for Kings of the Institute’s Edessa Bible.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
*
*
Bad
Excellent
*
*
*
*
ContributorBiography

Donald Walter

Donald M. Walter (Professor Emeritus, Philosophy and Religion, Davis and Elkins College) completed his doctoral dissertation under Charles T. Fritsch, James Barr, and Philip C. Hammond, and became the editor of Psalms and later Jeremiah for the Peshitta Institute’s critical edition of the Old Testament. He has served as an editor of the first volume of the Concordance to the Torah also issued by the Institute, and his major works include Studies in the Peshitta of Kings (Gorgias Press, 2009). With Gillian Greenberg, Dr. Walter is producing a number of translations from the Old Testament including Isaiah, the Twelve Prophets, Jeremiah, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1-2 Samuel, Ezekiel, and Daniel.

Customers who bought this item also bought

The East Syriac Psalm Headings

A Critical Edition
ISBN: 978-1-61143-867-3
The Psalm Headings remain one of the most difficult and puzzling pieces of the Hebrew Bible. The present study looks at how these titles were treated in the East Syriac traditions. This volume gives a history of research and presents a new critical edition based on previously unpublished manuscripts. The Psalm headings in the East Syriac tradition reflect the exegesis of the Antiochene school, especially Diodore of Tarsus and Theodore of Mopsuestia. The headings contain a summary of Theodore's exegesis which had an important influence on the work of Syriac interpreters such as Ishodad of Merv and Bar Hebraeus.
$154.00 $107.80

Jacob of Sarug's Homily on the Chariot that Prophet Ezekiel Saw

Metrical Homilies of Mar Jacob of Sarug
Translation and Introduction by Alexander Golitzin; Edited with Notes by Mary T. Hansbury
ISBN: 978-1-59333-735-3
This volume gives a bilingual Syriac-English edition of Saint Jacob of Sarug’s homily on the Chariot which the Prophet Ezekiel saw. The Syriac text is fully vocalized, and the translation is annotated with a commentary and biblical references. The volume constitutes a fascicle of Gorgias’s Complete Homilies of Saint Jacob of Sarug. In Syriac and English.
$50.00 $35.00

The Sub-Loco Notes in the Former Prophets of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0531-7
In BHS’s Masoretic apparatus, certain Masorah parva notes are marked “sub loco” in order to refer the reader to the corresponding commentary that was to be found in the third volume of Massorah Gedolah. Due to Weil’s passing, however, this commentary was never realized. This volume builds on Mynatt’s 1994 analysis and classification of the Pentateuch’s 297 sub loco notes by incorporating the Aleppo and Cairo Codices. Dost evaluates all 451 sub loco notes in the corpus of the Former Prophets, and evaluates Weil’s contribution by comparing Weil's revision of the Leningrad Codex’s Masorah against the Masorah of the Aleppo Codex.
$195.00 $136.50

The New Testament: A Literal Translation from the Syriac Peshitto Version

ISBN: 0-9715986-8-1
A literal accurate translation of the Syriac New Testament into English, with marginal notes showing the original Syriac. A valuable tool for students, and a good NT for Syriac Churches.
$222.00 $155.40