Close
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters
Jacob of Edessa was a seventh century polymath who witnessed the coming of Islam. In this collection of papers, specialists discuss the life and works of this figure with emphasis on the cultural landscape of the seventh century. Contributors include Sebastian P. Brock, Richard Price, Andreas Juckel, Alison Salvesen, Theresia Hainthaler, Amir Harrak, and Khalid Dinno.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-997-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: May 28,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 159
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-997-9
$163.00
x =

Jacob of Edessa was a seventh century polymath who witnessed the coming of Islam. In this collection of papers, specialists discuss the life and works of this literary figure with emphasis on the cultural landscape of the seventh century. Contributors include Sebastian P. Brock, Richard Price, Andreas Juckel, Alison Salvesen, Theresia Hainthaler, Amir Harrak, Aho Shemunkasho, and Khalid Dinno.

Jacob of Edessa was a seventh century polymath who witnessed the coming of Islam. In this collection of papers, specialists discuss the life and works of this literary figure with emphasis on the cultural landscape of the seventh century. Contributors include Sebastian P. Brock, Richard Price, Andreas Juckel, Alison Salvesen, Theresia Hainthaler, Amir Harrak, Aho Shemunkasho, and Khalid Dinno.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor Biography

George Kiraz

George A. Kiraz is the founder and director of Beth Mardutho: The Syriac Institute, and the president of Gorgias Press. He earned an MSt in Syriac Studies from Oxford University, and an MPhil and PhD from Cambridge University. He has an extensive list of publications in Syriac studies.

Gregorios Ibrahim

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Symposium of Mor Jacob of Edessa (page 7)
  • Jacob the Annotator. Jacobs Annotations to his Revised Translation of Severus Cathedral Homilies (page 15)
    • A. Differences in Usage between Greek and Syriac (page 16)
    • B. Word Play in Greek Lost in Syriac (page 17)
    • C. Lexical Matters (page 17)
    • D. Hebrew Matters (page 19)
    • E. Other Exegetical Matters (page 22)
    • F. Theological Matters (page 23)
    • G. Identifications of People or Places (page 25)
    • H. Realia (page 26)
  • The Physical World in Jacob of Edessas Hexaemeron (page 29)
  • Jacob of Edessa and his Enchiridion. Some Remarks (page 41)
    • 1. Jacob of Edessa (page 41)
      • 1.1. Some voices on Jacob of Edessa (page 42)
      • 1.2. A brief outline of Jacobs vita (page 44)
    • 2. Collection of Definitions (page 46)
      • 2.1. The literary genre (page 46)
      • 2.2. Some examples in the 6th and 7th centuries (page 47)
    • 3. The Enchiridion of Jacob of Edessa (page 50)
      • 3.1. Content of the Enchiridion (page 52)
        • 1. Nature (page 52)
        • 2. Substance (page 52)
        • 3. Hypostasis (page 53)
        • 4. Essentia (page 53)
        • 5. Person (page 54)
        • 6. Species (page 54)
      • 3.2. A Patristic Citation (page 54)
    • 4. Few Concluding Remarks (page 56)
  • Jacob of Edessa as a Chronicler (page 57)
    • The Chronicle of Jacob of Edessa and its Manuscript (page 58)
      • Structure of the Chronicle (page 59)
        • Part One (page 59)
        • Part Two (page 60)
      • The Contents of the Chronicle of Jacob of Edessa (page 62)
      • The Sources of the Chronicle of Jacob of Edessa (page 73)
      • Conclusion (page 77)
  • Did Jacob of Edessa Revise the New Testament Peshitta? (page 79)
    • Introduction (page 79)
    • I. The Gospel Quotations from the Hexaemeron (page 80)
      • a) Quotations aligned with the Peshitta and the Harklean (page 81)
      • b) The remaining Gospel quotations (page 85)
    • II. The 'Prehistory of the Revisionin Ms Bl Add. 17,134 (page 89)
      • 1. Jacobs revision of Severus Hymns (page 89)
      • 2. Jacob’s ?revisional’ quotations of the Peshitta (page 90)
      • 3. The ?prehistory’ (page 92)
    • III. Summary (page 92)
    • Bibliography (page 93)
  • The Christological Controversies of the Age of Jacob of Edessa (page 95)
    • The Monothelete Controversy as Viewed in Syria (page 96)
    • A Matter of Words (page 100)
    • The Modern Ecumenical Climate (page 104)
  • Was Jacob Trilingual? Jacob of Edessas Knowledge of Hebrew Revisited (page 107)
    • 1. Hexaemeron, Ed. Chabot, 6 P.76: Heavens (page 108)
    • 2. Hexaemeron, Ed. Chabot, P. 83A…b: on the Names of the South and North Winds (page 110)
    • 3. Hexaemeron, Ed. Chabot, P. 147A: the Moon (page 111)
    • 4. HEXAEMERON, ed. Chabot, p. 207b…208a:THE INDIAN BIRD (Job 39.13…18). (page 112)
    • 4. Hexaemeron, Ed. Chabot, P. 207B…208a:the Indian Bird (Job 39.13…18). (page 112)
    • 5. Hexaemeron P. 283B: God Created All Humanity (page 114)
    • 6. Hexaemeron, Ed. Chabot, 324B (page 115)
    • 7. Jacobs Scholion on the Divine Name,ed. Brière, P. 196/[700] (page 116)
    • Conclusion (page 118)
  • The Final Statement for Mor Jacob of Edessa Symposium Held in Aleppo, June 9…12, 2008 (page 121)
    • List of the Scholars (page 123)
Customers who bought this item also bought

The New Syriac Primer, 2nd Edition

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 9
ISBN: 978-1-59333-325-6
A truly useful introduction to the Syriac language is a rare find. This practical initiation to the study of this ancient language of the Christian church speaks with clarity and authority. A fruitful integration of scholarly introduction and practical application, this primer is more than a simple grammar or syntactic introduction to the language. Writing in a style designed for beginners, Kiraz avoids technical language and strives for a reader-friendly inductive approach. Readings from actual Syriac texts allow the student to experience the language first hand and the basics of the grammar of the language are ably explained. The book comes with downloadable material so that readers may listen to all reading sentences and text passages in the book.
$48.00

The Syriac Dot

A Short History
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0425-9
The dot is used for everything in Syriac from tense to gender, number, and pronunciation, and unsurprisingly represents one of the biggest obstacles to learning the language. Using inscriptions, early grammars, and experiments with modern scribes, Dr. Kiraz peels back the evolution of the dot layer by layer to explain each of its uses in detail and to show how it adopted the wide range of uses it has today.
$42.00

Gorgias Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Syriac Heritage

ISBN: 978-1-59333-714-8
The Gorgias Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Syriac Heritage (GEDSH) is the first major encyclopedia-type reference work devoted exclusively to Syriac Christianity, both as a field of scholarly inquiry and as the inheritance of Syriac Christians today. In more than 600 entries it covers the Syriac heritage from its beginnings in the first centuries of the Common Era up to the present day. Special attention is given to authors, literary works, scholars, and locations that are associated with the Classical Syriac tradition. Within this tradition, the diversity of Syriac Christianity is highlighted as well as Syriac Christianity’s broader literary and historical contexts, with major entries devoted to Greek and Arabic authors and more general themes, such as Syriac Christianity’s contacts with Judaism and Islam, and with Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, and Georgian Christianities.
$130.00

Pocket Gorgias Syriac-English Dictionary

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0707-6
The Pocket Dictionary is both a convenient academic resource and a door into the world of Modern Literary Syriac. With 13,000 entries drawn from the major existing works, it is a practical tool for all but the most specialized Classical Syriac texts.
$45.00