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Textual Variation: Theological and Social Tendencies?


Papers from the Fifth Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament


Did scribes intentionally change the text of the New Testament? This book argues they did not and disputes the claims that variant readings are theologically motivated. Using evidence gathered from some of the earliest surviving biblical manuscripts these essays reconstruct the copying habits of scribes and explore the contexts in which they worked. Alongside these are studies of selected early Christian writings, which illustrate attitudes to and examples of textual change.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-789-6
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Texts and Studies 6
Publication Date: Dec 31,2008
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 209
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-789-6
$95.00
$57.00

Did scribes change the text of the New Testament? This book questions the assumption that they did and the claim that variant readings are due to theological motivation or social difference. Evidence is gathered from some of the earliest surviving biblical manuscripts in order to reconstruct the copying habits of scribes and to explore the contexts in which they worked. Alongside these are studies of selected early Christian authors and writings, which illustrate attitudes to and examples of textual change. The papers were first presented at a colloquium in Birmingham and further developed in the light of subsequent discussion and interaction between the presenters. The international team of contributors represents a wide range of approaches and theories and includes many leaders in the field.


D.C. Parker is Edward Cadbury Professor of Theology at the University of Birmingham and a Director of the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing. He is Executive Editor of the International Greek New Testament Project. H.A.G. Houghton is a Research Fellow in Theology at the University of Birmingham, working on an edition of the Vetus Latina Iohannes. He is also a member of the International Greek New Testament Project committee.

Did scribes change the text of the New Testament? This book questions the assumption that they did and the claim that variant readings are due to theological motivation or social difference. Evidence is gathered from some of the earliest surviving biblical manuscripts in order to reconstruct the copying habits of scribes and to explore the contexts in which they worked. Alongside these are studies of selected early Christian authors and writings, which illustrate attitudes to and examples of textual change. The papers were first presented at a colloquium in Birmingham and further developed in the light of subsequent discussion and interaction between the presenters. The international team of contributors represents a wide range of approaches and theories and includes many leaders in the field.


D.C. Parker is Edward Cadbury Professor of Theology at the University of Birmingham and a Director of the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing. He is Executive Editor of the International Greek New Testament Project. H.A.G. Houghton is a Research Fellow in Theology at the University of Birmingham, working on an edition of the Vetus Latina Iohannes. He is also a member of the International Greek New Testament Project committee.

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Contributor Biography

H. A. G. Houghton

H.A.G. Houghton is Reader in New Testament Textual Scholarship and deputy director of the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing at the University of Birmingham. He was Principal Investigator of the COMPAUL project from 2011 to 2016.

David Parker