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That Nothing May Be Lost

Papers from the Twelfth Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament


Fragmentary material comprises a significant part of the manuscript tradition of the New Testament. Whether it be tattered papyrus documents, the abbreviated citation of biblical texts in early Christian writings, or the scattering of once-whole manuscripts, the story of the New Testament is a gathering of fragments—in all their forms—in the hopes that “nothing may be lost.” This volume is a result of the Twelfth Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament, wherein presenters were invited to approach the theme of “fragments” from any philological or philosophical framework. Chapters discuss the possible forgery of a biblical papyrus, the dismemberment of a sixteenth-century lectionary manuscript, and the Arabic text of Romans preserved in a fragmentary bilingual codex. Elsewhere, software tools are employed to re-assess the readings of manuscripts digitised in decades past and to re-evaluate the stemma of a family of manuscripts. Further contributions consider the fragments of the biblical text contained in patristic commentaries and Byzantine catenae. The wide-ranging scope of the research contained in this volume reflects the need to examine these pieces of the past so that the shape of research in the present accurately illustrates the tapestry that is the history of the New Testament texts.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-4367-8
  • *
Publication Status: Forthcoming
Publication Date: Nov 30,2022
Interior Color: Black with Color Inserts
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 294
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4367-8
$114.95
Your price: $91.96

The manuscript tradition of the New Testament is built upon the foundations of fragmentary material. Whether it be the majority of papyrus documents, the abbreviated citation of biblical material in early Christian writings, or the scattering of once-whole manuscripts across time and space, the story of the New Testament is a gathering of fragments—in all their forms—in the hopes that “nothing may be lost.” This present volume is a result of the Twelfth Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament, wherein presenters were invited to approach the theme of “fragments” from any philological or philosophical framework. Chapters discuss the possible forgery of a biblical papyrus, the dismemberment of a sixteenth-century lectionary manuscript, and the Arabic text of Romans preserved in a fragmentary bilingual codex. Elsewhere, software tools are employed to re-assess the readings of manuscripts digitised in decades past and to join multiple manuscripts together through a relational stemma. Further contributions consider the fragments of the biblical text—both as lemmatic additions to commentaries and stand-alone portions of the biblical text—contained in patristic commentaries and Byzantine catenae. The wide-ranging scope of the research contained in this volume reflects the value of this fragmentary history of the New Testament and the need continually to examine these pieces of the past so that the shape of research in the present accurately illustrates the tapestry that is the history of the New Testament texts.

The manuscript tradition of the New Testament is built upon the foundations of fragmentary material. Whether it be the majority of papyrus documents, the abbreviated citation of biblical material in early Christian writings, or the scattering of once-whole manuscripts across time and space, the story of the New Testament is a gathering of fragments—in all their forms—in the hopes that “nothing may be lost.” This present volume is a result of the Twelfth Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament, wherein presenters were invited to approach the theme of “fragments” from any philological or philosophical framework. Chapters discuss the possible forgery of a biblical papyrus, the dismemberment of a sixteenth-century lectionary manuscript, and the Arabic text of Romans preserved in a fragmentary bilingual codex. Elsewhere, software tools are employed to re-assess the readings of manuscripts digitised in decades past and to join multiple manuscripts together through a relational stemma. Further contributions consider the fragments of the biblical text—both as lemmatic additions to commentaries and stand-alone portions of the biblical text—contained in patristic commentaries and Byzantine catenae. The wide-ranging scope of the research contained in this volume reflects the value of this fragmentary history of the New Testament and the need continually to examine these pieces of the past so that the shape of research in the present accurately illustrates the tapestry that is the history of the New Testament texts.

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ContributorBiography

Jacopo Marcon

Jacopo Marcon is a member of ITSEE in the University of Birmingham and the ERC-funded CATENA Project. His research investigates the manuscript and textual tradition of the Pseudo-Oecumenian catena on Romans, with a particular focus on how the extracts from the patristic sources have been adapted within the context of the catena. He has previously contributed to a catalogue of the Greek manuscripts in Birmingham.

Andrew Patton

Andrew J. Patton is a member of ITSEE in the University of and the ERC-funded CATENA Project. His research focuses on the development of the catenae on the gospels, investigating how the catenists constructed their commentaries from multiple sources—especially other catenae and a collection of scholia given the attribution ἐξ ἀνεπιγράφου. He has published in Novum Testamentum on the so-called ‘Western’ order of the gospels and collaborated on a catalogue of the Greek manuscripts in Birmingham.

Emanuele Scieri

Emanuele Scieri is a member of ITSEE in the University of Birmingham and the ERC-funded CATENA Project. His research interests range from Late Antique and Byzantine literature to New Testament Studies, with an emphasis on Greek Philology and Textual Criticism. His doctoral thesis investigates the catena manuscripts on the Acts of the Apostles. He has published in the journals Vigiliae Christianae and Sileno.

Clark Bates

Clark Bates is a member of the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing (ITSEE) in the University of Birmingham and a recipient of the Midlands4Cities Doctoral Training Scholarship. He has published in the Expository Times, Diogenes, and Byzantine Review, and is currently working on a critical edition and translation of the Pseudo-Oecumenian catena of Ephesians.

List of Contributors .................................................................. ix
Abbreviations ........................................................................ xiii
Introduction ............................................................................. xv
1. Possible Markers of Inauthenticity in a Greek New Testament
Papyrus: Genuinely Bad or a Very Good Fake?
Elijah Hixson ...................................................................... 1
2. The Fragmentation and Digital Reconstruction of Lectionary
2434
Andrew J. Patton .............................................................. 39
3. The Arabic Text of Romans 1:1–9a; 24b–29 in Sinai Greek
New Finds Majuscule 2
Duane G. McCrory ............................................................ 69
4. New Readings in GA 1506 and the Use of Digital Tools
David Flood .................................................................... 101
5. A Stemma of Mark in Family 13 using Probability Structure
Analysis
G.P. Farthing .................................................................. 129
6. Philippus Presbyter’s Commentary on Job: A Source for the
Study of Latin Translations of the New Testament
Marie Frey Rébeillé-Borgella ............................................ 165
7. A Missing Link in the Chain: A Neglected Fragmentary
Manuscript of the Ps. Oecumenian Catena on Romans
(Oxford, Bodleian Library, Auct. T.1.7 [Misc. 185]) (GA
2962)
Jacopo Marcon ............................................................... 187
8. Exegetical Fragments: Observations on the Catenae on Acts
in Vatican, BAV, Reg. gr. 6 (GA 886)
Emanuele Scieri .............................................................. 215
9. The Paraclete’s Teaching: The Text and Exegesis of John
14:25–26 and John 16:12–15 in the Writings of Eusebius
of Caesarea and Cyril of Jerusalem
Valentin Andronache ....................................................... 241
Indices .................................................................................. 259
Index of Biblical Passages .............................................. 259
Index of Manuscripts ..................................................... 263
Index of Subjects ........................................................... 267

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