You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters

The Archaeology of Cult in Middle Bronze Age Canaan


The Sacred Area at Tel Haror, Israel


What was Canaanite religion like during the Middle Bronze Age, at the time of the biblical patriarchs? This volume presents a theoretical model for identifying ritual behavior in the archaeological record, providing a test case using the rich material culture and structures that have been unearthed at the biblical city of Gerar (Tel Haror, Israel).
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-791-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jun 18,2013
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 268
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-791-9
$149.00
$89.40

What was Canaanite religion like during the Middle Bronze Age, at the time of the biblical patriarchs? This volume presents a theoretical model for identifying ritual behavior in the archaeological record, providing a test case using the rich material culture and structures that have been unearthed at the biblical city of Gerar (Tel Haror, Israel). The analysis of these finds presents a revealing glimpse into the elaborate rituals that the Canaanites enjoyed in their communities.

Canaanite public ritual life was centered around a temple and its courtyards. It was here that priests performed rituals within the temple while people gathered in the courtyards to watch animals being sacrificed on altars, to smell burning incense, and to offer other foods sometimes in miniature votive vessels. Upon completion of the sacrifices, the people remained in the courtyards and adjoining rooms to enjoy their ritual meals. It is here that the archaeological evidence strongly attests to the cooking, serving, and consuming of foods and beverages. Canaanites also used their sacred areas for rituals of healing (involving puppies) and for the sanctifying of treaties (using donkeys).

What was Canaanite religion like during the Middle Bronze Age, at the time of the biblical patriarchs? This volume presents a theoretical model for identifying ritual behavior in the archaeological record, providing a test case using the rich material culture and structures that have been unearthed at the biblical city of Gerar (Tel Haror, Israel). The analysis of these finds presents a revealing glimpse into the elaborate rituals that the Canaanites enjoyed in their communities.

Canaanite public ritual life was centered around a temple and its courtyards. It was here that priests performed rituals within the temple while people gathered in the courtyards to watch animals being sacrificed on altars, to smell burning incense, and to offer other foods sometimes in miniature votive vessels. Upon completion of the sacrifices, the people remained in the courtyards and adjoining rooms to enjoy their ritual meals. It is here that the archaeological evidence strongly attests to the cooking, serving, and consuming of foods and beverages. Canaanites also used their sacred areas for rituals of healing (involving puppies) and for the sanctifying of treaties (using donkeys).

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor Biography

Jill Katz

Jill Citron Katz is a Lecturer in Archaeology and Anthropology at Yeshiva University. She holds a B.A. degree in Anthropology (Archaeology) from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently involved in excavations at the Philistine city of Gath (Tell es-Safi) in Israel.

  • Dedication (page 5)
  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • Preface (page 11)
  • Acknowledgments (page 15)
  • 1. Introduction (page 17)
  • 2. Towards a Model for Identifying Cult in the Archaeological Record (page 21)
  • 3. The Sacred Area at Tel Haror (page 45)
  • 4. Additional Middle Bronze Age Sacred Areas in Canaan (page 137)
  • 5. Analysis of Middle Bronze Age Sacred Areas in Canaan (page 169)
  • 6. Conclusion (page 177)
  • Appendix (page 185)
  • Bibliography (page 241)
  • Index (page 265)
Customers who bought this item also bought

Averroes, the Decisive Treatise

The Connection Between Islamic Religious Law and Philosophy
Edited with an Introduction by Massimo Campanini
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0638-3
The Decisive Treatise is perhaps the most controversial work of Averroes (Ibn Rushd, 1126-1198) and belongs to a trilogy which boldly represent the philosophical contribution to Islamic theology of this famous Andalusian commentator on Aristotle. The Decisive Treatise is a fatwa (a legal opinion) that the judge, Averroes, promulgated for his fellow Malikite jurists in order to demonstrate that the study of philosophy is not only licit from the point of view of religious law, but even mandatory for the skilled people. However, many subjects are dealt with in this comparatively short book: An epistemology aimed to show that philosophical truth and religious truth are not in contradiction; a sociology of knowledge pointing out that humans are classified in three classes (philosophers, theologians, common folk); a Qur’anic hermeneutics suggesting how to approach philosophically the Holy Book in agreement with religious requirements and linguistic rules.
$70.20

Xenophon's Memorabilia and The Apology of Socrates translated by Sarah Fielding

Edited with Notes and Introduction by Hélène Pignot
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0614-7
Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), the younger sister of Henry Fielding, and the close friend of his literary rival Samuel Richardson, was one of the very few English women to master ancient languages like Latin and Greek. With the help of Shaftesbury's nephew, James Harris, a distinguished writer, scholar and grammarian, she embarked on the ambitious project of translating Xenophon's Memorabilia and the Apology of Socrates from the Greek. This work, titled Memoirs of Socrates, with the Defence of Socrates before his Judges, was finally released in 1762. She proved a discreet editor and a talented Hellenist, whose elegant style garnered praise from Tobias Smollett in his Critical Review. This superb translation is re-published in its entirety for the first time since the 18th century.
$84.60

The Other Mathematics

Language and Logic in Egyptian and in General
ISBN: 978-1-59333-369-0
This book is about attribute mathematics, in which nothing ever gets bigger or smaller. More specifically, it is about some of what attribute mathematics can do toward the full digitalization of thought and language. The matter is relevant not only directly to linguistics and philosophy but also indirectly to electrical engineering and neuroscience. The twenty-first century will be that of the brain. Human existence will gradually be turned inside out as tools such as genetics and Boolean algebra allow us to see ourselves function on the smallest scale while it is happening.
$108.60

A Comparison of Ancient Near Eastern Law Collections Prior to the First Millennium BC

ISBN: 978-1-59333-221-1
This book highlights and explains consistent differences in both the framing and content of the various pre-first millennium BC law collections of Mesopotamia, Egypt and Hatti. The differences between collections are placed in the broader background of the worldview and political make-up of the societies and individuals that created them, and their historical context.
$93.60