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The Assyrians in Australian Archives


Documents from the National Archives of Australia and Australian War Memorial, 1914–1947


The small Assyrian community proved to be loyal, dedicated and hard-working citizens of Australia during the years 1914–1947. For the first time the Assyrian issue will be seen through the eyes of Australian official documents and it is hoped that this monograph will raise awareness of these people within Australia and abroad.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-993-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 17
Publication Date: Apr 14,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 10 x 12.5
Page Count: 519
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-993-1
$177.85
$106.71

This collection of official documents from the National Archives of Australia and Australian War Memorial will show the events unfolding on the Assyrian issue during the years 1914–1947. The Assyrian question is an obscure and even unknown event for many people of the western world. These documents will highlight the Assyrian issue from an Australian and international perspective.

During the period 1914–1947, Great Britain was responsible for the foreign policy of its Empire which included its Dominions (Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa) and Colonies. Australia was responsible for its own internal affairs with the Colonial Office (later the Dominions Office) in London providing information on Imperial foreign policy. This information was channeled through Governor General’s Office who, in turn, forwarded it to the Prime Minister's Department. After 1919, Australia exhibited a more ‘independent’ foreign policy within a British Imperial framework.

Although Australia did not have any direct political or economic links with the Middle East, her troops played an important part in the defeat of the Ottoman Empire at the end of the First World War. Assyrians in Australia rejoiced with the news of the Allied victory in the Middle East.

Australian diplomats at the League of Nations in Geneva and Australian High Commission in London kept their government informed on events unfolding in Iraq and also on the fate of the Assyrians. Their dispatches helped to shape Australian attitudes towards this volatile region during the inter-war years and beyond.

This collection of official documents from the National Archives of Australia and Australian War Memorial will show the events unfolding on the Assyrian issue during the years 1914–1947. The Assyrian question is an obscure and even unknown event for many people of the western world. These documents will highlight the Assyrian issue from an Australian and international perspective.

During the period 1914–1947, Great Britain was responsible for the foreign policy of its Empire which included its Dominions (Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa) and Colonies. Australia was responsible for its own internal affairs with the Colonial Office (later the Dominions Office) in London providing information on Imperial foreign policy. This information was channeled through Governor General’s Office who, in turn, forwarded it to the Prime Minister's Department. After 1919, Australia exhibited a more ‘independent’ foreign policy within a British Imperial framework.

Although Australia did not have any direct political or economic links with the Middle East, her troops played an important part in the defeat of the Ottoman Empire at the end of the First World War. Assyrians in Australia rejoiced with the news of the Allied victory in the Middle East.

Australian diplomats at the League of Nations in Geneva and Australian High Commission in London kept their government informed on events unfolding in Iraq and also on the fate of the Assyrians. Their dispatches helped to shape Australian attitudes towards this volatile region during the inter-war years and beyond.

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Contributor Biography

Stavros Stavridis

Stavros T. Stavridis is an independent historical researcher and holds an MA in Greek/Australian history from RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. He has written extensively on Greek, Armenians and Assyrians and conflict in Asia Minor covering the period 1890-1923. His book titled The Greek-Turkish War 1919-23: an Australian press perspective was published by Gorgias Press in 2009

David Chibo

David Chibo is an Australian-born Iraqi from the Assyrian-Christian community. He spent six months prior to the Iraq invasion working in northern Iraq with local aid groups delivering humanitarian relief as well as providing technical training to the local population.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS (page 5)
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (page 7)
  • MAPS (page 9)
  • PREFACE (page 11)
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (page 13)
  • INTRODUCTION (page 15)
  • CHAPTER 1 WORLD WAR 1 AND ITS AFTERMATH (page 33)
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS (page 103)
  • 1.C LIST OF DOCUMENTS FOR CHAPTER.1 (page 123)
  • CHAPTER 2 BOGUS COLLECTORS (page 127)
  • CHAPTER 3 HUMAN RIGHTS IN AUSTRALIA (page 171)
  • 3.C LIST OF DOCUMENTS FOR CHAPTER.3 (page 216)
  • CHAPTER 4 MOSUL AND ECONOMIC INTERESTS (page 221)
  • 4.C LIST OF DOCUMENTS FOR CHAPTER.4 (page 305)
  • CHAPTER 5 THE SIMELE MASSACRE (page 309)
  • 5.C LIST OF DOCUMENTS FOR CHAPTER.5 (page 337)
  • CHAPTER 6 RESOLUTION AND RESETTLEMENT (page 339)
  • 6.C LIST OF DOCUMENTS FOR CHAPTER.6 (page 407)
  • CHAPTER 7 THE LEVIES OF HABBANIYA (page 411)
  • 7.C LIST OF DOCUMENTS FOR CHAPTER.7 (page 503)
  • APPENDIX 1 (page 509)
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY (page 513)