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The Book of Isaiah According to the Syriac Peshitta Version with English Translation


English Translation by Gillian Greenberg & Donald M. Walter; Text Prepared by George Anton Kiraz & Joseph Bali
A new English translation of the Syriac Peshitta along with the Syriac text carried out by an international team of scholars. Greenberg and Walter have produced an annotated translation of the Peshitta version of the Book of Isaiah, while Kiraz and Bali have edited the Peshitta text. The English translation and the Syriac text are shown on facing pages so that both can be studied together.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0155-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Surath Kthob 1
Publication Date: Apr 30,2012
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 376
Languages: English, Syriac
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0155-5
$150.00

This volume is the first in a series of English translations of the Syriac Peshitta along with the Syriac text carried out by an international team of scholars. Greenberg and Walter have translated the Peshitta of Isaiah, while Kiraz and Bali have prepared the Syriac text in the west Syriac script fully vocalized and pointed. The translation and the Syriac text are presented on facing pages so that both can be studied together. All readers are catered for: those wanting to read the Syriac text of Isaiah in English, those wanting to improve their grasp of Syriac by reading the original language along with a translation with its extensive annotations, and those wanting to focus on a fully vocalized Syriac text.

The Peshitta, a translation from the Hebrew, was probably written in Edessa in Mesopotamia in the second century CE. Greenberg and Walter furnish an Introduction giving background information about the Syriac text, and explain and illustrate their translation technique. Addenda are included in the Introduction, giving examples of mistranslation from the original Hebrew into Syriac, examples of apparent corruption of the Syriac text having occurred prior to our extant manuscripts, and a discussion of many passages which are particularly difficult.

Appendices are provided: the first compares the versification of the Syriac text used here, printed in Mosul by the Dominicans in the nineteenth century, with that of manuscript 7a1 as edited and used as the basic text of the Leiden Peshitta edition of Isaiah. A second compares the variants of Mosul with Leiden and indicates when its variants lack any support from ancient manuscripts. A third gives an overview of the rendering of Hebrew names into Syriac.

This volume is the first in a series of English translations of the Syriac Peshitta along with the Syriac text carried out by an international team of scholars. Greenberg and Walter have translated the Peshitta of Isaiah, while Kiraz and Bali have prepared the Syriac text in the west Syriac script fully vocalized and pointed. The translation and the Syriac text are presented on facing pages so that both can be studied together. All readers are catered for: those wanting to read the Syriac text of Isaiah in English, those wanting to improve their grasp of Syriac by reading the original language along with a translation with its extensive annotations, and those wanting to focus on a fully vocalized Syriac text.

The Peshitta, a translation from the Hebrew, was probably written in Edessa in Mesopotamia in the second century CE. Greenberg and Walter furnish an Introduction giving background information about the Syriac text, and explain and illustrate their translation technique. Addenda are included in the Introduction, giving examples of mistranslation from the original Hebrew into Syriac, examples of apparent corruption of the Syriac text having occurred prior to our extant manuscripts, and a discussion of many passages which are particularly difficult.

Appendices are provided: the first compares the versification of the Syriac text used here, printed in Mosul by the Dominicans in the nineteenth century, with that of manuscript 7a1 as edited and used as the basic text of the Leiden Peshitta edition of Isaiah. A second compares the variants of Mosul with Leiden and indicates when its variants lack any support from ancient manuscripts. A third gives an overview of the rendering of Hebrew names into Syriac.

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Contributor Biography

Gillian Greenberg

Gillian Greenberg is a senior research fellow in the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College London, where she teaches Syriac. Her MA and PhD are from the University of London. Her research field is the Peshitta, with special interest in the major prophets, on whom she has published a monograph and a number of articles.

Donald Walter

see monograph on Kings published by Gorgias Press

George Kiraz

George A. Kiraz is the founder and director of Beth Mardutho: The Syriac Institute, and the president of Gorgias Press. He earned an MSt in Syriac Studies from Oxford University, and an MPhil and PhD from Cambridge University. He has an extensive list of publications in Syriac studies.

Joseph Bali

  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • FOREWORD TO THE EDITION (page 9)
    • Making of the Text (page 9)
    • Orthographic Diversions from Leiden and Mosul (page 11)
    • Orthographic Diversions from Mosul (page 12)
    • Text Organization (page 13)
    • Acknowledgements (page 13)
  • ABBREVIATIONS (page 15)
  • INTRODUCTION TO THE TRANSLATION (page 17)
    • The Peshi?ta (page 17)
    • The Book of Isaiah (page 17)
    • Translation Policy (page 18)
    • Notes (page 18)
    • Translation Technique (page 19)
    • Mistranslation (page 22)
    • Inner-Syriac Corruption (page 22)
    • Meaning Obscure (page 23)
    • Names (page 23)
    • Addendum 1: Mistranslation (page 23)
    • Addendum 2: Inner-Syriac Corruption. (page 26)
    • Addendum 3: Meaning Obscure (page 27)
  • APPENDIX 1: VERSIFICATION (page 29)
  • APPENDIX 2: VARIANT READINGS (page 31)
  • APPENDIX 3: NAMES (page 39)
    • Common Syriac Proper Names (page 39)
    • Replacement (page 39)
    • Initial Positions (page 39)
    • Medial Positions (page 40)
    • Endings (page 41)
    • Sibilants (Initial, Medial, Final) (page 41)
    • Translation (page 42)
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY (page 43)
    • LEXICA AND DICTIONARIES (page 43)
    • REFERENCE (page 43)
    • GENERAL INTEREST (page 43)
  • TEXT AND TRANSLATION (page 45)
  • Chapter 66 (page 50)
  • Chapter 65 (page 56)
  • Chapter 64 (page 60)
  • Chapter 63 (page 64)
  • Chapter 62 (page 68)
  • Chapter 61 (page 72)
  • Chapter 60 (page 78)
  • Chapter 59 (page 84)
  • Chapter 58 (page 88)
  • Chapter 57 (page 94)
  • Chapter 56 (page 98)
  • Chapter 55 (page 102)
  • Chapter 54 (page 106)
  • Chapter 53 (page 110)
  • Chapter 52 (page 114)
  • Chapter 51 (page 120)
  • Chapter 50 (page 124)
  • Chapter 49 (page 130)
  • Chapter 48 (page 134)
  • Chapter 47 (page 138)
  • Chapter 46 (page 142)
  • Chapter 45 (page 148)
  • Chapter 44 (page 156)
  • Chapter 43 (page 162)
  • Chapter 42 (page 168)
  • Chapter 41 (page 174)
  • Chapter 40 (page 180)
  • Chapter 39 (page 182)
  • Chapter 38 (page 188)
  • Chapter 37 (page 196)
  • Chapter 36 (page 202)
  • Chapter 35 (page 206)
  • Chapter 34 (page 210)
  • Chapter 33 (page 216)
  • Chapter 32 (page 220)
  • Chapter 31 (page 222)
  • Chapter 30 (page 230)
  • Chapter 29 (page 236)
  • Chapter 28 (page 242)
  • Chapter 27 (page 246)
  • Chapter 26 (page 252)
  • Chapter 25 (page 256)
  • Chapter 24 (page 260)
  • Chapter 23 (page 264)
  • Chapter 22 (page 270)
  • Chapter 21 (page 274)
  • Chapter 20 (page 276)
  • Chapter 19 (page 282)
  • Chapter 18 (page 284)
  • Chapter 17 (page 288)
  • Chapter 16 (page 292)
  • Chapter 15 (page 294)
  • Chapter 14 (page 302)
  • Chapter 13 (page 308)
  • Chapter 12 (page 310)
  • Chapter 11 (page 314)
  • Chapter 10 (page 322)
  • Chapter 9 (page 328)
  • Chapter 8 (page 332)
  • Chapter 7 (page 338)
  • Chapter 6 (page 342)
  • Chapter 5 (page 350)
  • Chapter 4 (page 352)
  • Chapter 3 (page 358)
  • Chapter 2 (page 362)
  • Chapter 1 (page 368)