Close
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters
The Book of the Dove is the ascetical guide composed by Bar-Hebraeus for aspiring hermits. It concerns the training of the body and the soul for ascetical life. The spiritual rest of the perfect is also described, along with a spiritual autobiography of Bar-Hebraeus himself.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-678-3
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Mar 19,2007
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 96
Language: Syriac
ISBN: 978-1-59333-678-3
$139.00
$83.40

Bar-Hebraeus was a prolific writer for his age. Among the many treasures he produced was his ascetical training guide known as The Book of the Dove. Written especially for those in Eastern Christianity who aspired to be hermits, this treatise offers practical spiritual advice for those in his charge in the Syriac church. The study is divided into four parts, treating the training of the body, training the soul, the spiritual rest of the perfect, and a section including Bar-Hebraeus’ spiritual autobiography. A classic of monastic literature, The Book of the Dove retains valuable insights into spiritual exercises, including prayer, fasting, repentance, humility, and alienation from the world. Presented here in the original Syriac, this text will be of interest to the historian as well as readers interested in the Medieval Eastern Church. In a world frantically seeking a spiritual center, the wisdom of one of Orthodoxy’s most erudite writers on spiritual development is always welcome.

Gregory Abulfaraj Bar-Hebraeus (1226-1286) was a bishop of the Syrian Orthodox Church. Trained as a physician, Bar-Hebraeus made his way to the life of the church, being consecrated as bishop at the age of 20. His writings encompass philosophy, grammar, poetry, and theology as well as what was generally the science of the day. A noted compiler of information, he was a prolific writer and is recognized today as one of the most notable figures in the history of Eastern Christendom.

Bar-Hebraeus was a prolific writer for his age. Among the many treasures he produced was his ascetical training guide known as The Book of the Dove. Written especially for those in Eastern Christianity who aspired to be hermits, this treatise offers practical spiritual advice for those in his charge in the Syriac church. The study is divided into four parts, treating the training of the body, training the soul, the spiritual rest of the perfect, and a section including Bar-Hebraeus’ spiritual autobiography. A classic of monastic literature, The Book of the Dove retains valuable insights into spiritual exercises, including prayer, fasting, repentance, humility, and alienation from the world. Presented here in the original Syriac, this text will be of interest to the historian as well as readers interested in the Medieval Eastern Church. In a world frantically seeking a spiritual center, the wisdom of one of Orthodoxy’s most erudite writers on spiritual development is always welcome.

Gregory Abulfaraj Bar-Hebraeus (1226-1286) was a bishop of the Syrian Orthodox Church. Trained as a physician, Bar-Hebraeus made his way to the life of the church, being consecrated as bishop at the age of 20. His writings encompass philosophy, grammar, poetry, and theology as well as what was generally the science of the day. A noted compiler of information, he was a prolific writer and is recognized today as one of the most notable figures in the history of Eastern Christendom.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor

Gregory Abulfaraj Bar Hebraeus

Customers who bought this item also bought

The Book of Ethics

Edited by Paul Bedjan
ISBN: 978-1-59333-421-5
Bar Hebraeus, a celebrated Syriac writer of the thirteenth century, wrote on nearly every subject imaginable. The Book of Ethics is a manual of discipline and etiquette covering secular life as well as spiritual life.
$144.60

Women in Aphrahat: Some Observations

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 1039
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0087-9
Fourth-century Aphrahat is characterized as misogynist, especially when he compares women to Satan. This may be an unintended result of contemporary Christian literature. The the eschatological context of Aphrahat’s asceticism, salvific role of Mary, victimization in Aphrahat’s work, and positive statements about women negotiate this view.
$21.00

Barhebraeus: A Bio-Bibliography

ISBN: 978-1-59333-148-1
An extensive account of the life and works of Barhebraeus based on the latest research. It includes an appendix containing a comprehensive list of bibliographical references and manuscripts relating to Barhebraeus.
$138.60

Hippolytus of Rome: Commentary on Daniel and 'Chronicon'

Commentary on Daniel and 'Chronicon'
By T. C. Schmidt; Contribution by Nick Nicholas
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0658-1
This volume contains an English translation and introduction to Hippolytus of Rome's Commentary on Daniel and his Chronicon. Both works are the first writings of their kind. The commentary is the earliest extant Christian commentary on a book of the Bible and the Chronicon is the first extant Christian historical work.
$96.00