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The Chronicle of Michael the Great (The Edessa-Aleppo Syriac Codex)


Books XV–XXI. From the Year 1050 to 1195 AD


Edited and Translated by Amir Harrak
Michael the Great was elected patriarch of the Syriac Orthodox church in a most instable period. He nevertheless, found time, clarity of mind, and determination to write a voluminous world chronicle, which he completed four years before he died in November 7, 1199. The present edition and its translation begin with Book XV and end with Book XXI, the last Book in the Chronicle, thereby covering more than 160 years, from AD 1031 to AD 1195.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-4031-8
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Apr 16,2019
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 531
Languages: English, Syriac
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4031-8
$215.00
$129.00

The voluminous Chronicle of Michael the Great, Syriac Orthodox patriarch from 1166 to 1199, covers human and ecclesiastical histories, stretching from the biblical account of the Creation to the year 1195. The current edition and translation of Books XV to XXI, based on the 16th century Edessa-Aleppo Syriac Codex, discuss history from 1050 to 1195, during which, warring nations, including Turks, Crusaders, Arabs, Greeks and Armenians, coveted extensive domains lost to the Abbasid Caliphate for ever. The two centuries covered by the present book witnessed the rise and fall of the Crusaders, the ever fighting Turkish tribes, which eventually controlled Eastern Anatolia and Syria in the name of the Abbasid Caliphate, and Fatimid violent siege and capture of Jerusalem from the Crusaders. The author was an eyewitness of some fifty years of crucial historical, celestial, and seismic happenings. Although internal politics of the Syriac Orthodox Church marred his patriarchate, he admirably remained clear-minded, unbending administrator, and profoundly Christian.

 

The voluminous Chronicle of Michael the Great, Syriac Orthodox patriarch from 1166 to 1199, covers human and ecclesiastical histories, stretching from the biblical account of the Creation to the year 1195. The current edition and translation of Books XV to XXI, based on the 16th century Edessa-Aleppo Syriac Codex, discuss history from 1050 to 1195, during which, warring nations, including Turks, Crusaders, Arabs, Greeks and Armenians, coveted extensive domains lost to the Abbasid Caliphate for ever. The two centuries covered by the present book witnessed the rise and fall of the Crusaders, the ever fighting Turkish tribes, which eventually controlled Eastern Anatolia and Syria in the name of the Abbasid Caliphate, and Fatimid violent siege and capture of Jerusalem from the Crusaders. The author was an eyewitness of some fifty years of crucial historical, celestial, and seismic happenings. Although internal politics of the Syriac Orthodox Church marred his patriarchate, he admirably remained clear-minded, unbending administrator, and profoundly Christian.

 

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Contributor Biography

Amir Harrak

Amir Harrak is full professor at the University of Toronto. His specialty is Aramaic and Syriac languages and literatures. His many publications deal with Syriac epigraphy, Chronicles, and cataloguing of manuscripts.

Table of Contents (v)
Bibliographic Abbreviations (vii) 
Syriac Sources  (vii)
Armenian Sources (vii) 
Arabic Sources (viii) 
Greek Sources (viii) 
Dictionaries (viii)
Series and Periodicals (viii)

Introduction  (ix)
The Author  (ix) 
The Organization of the Chronicle (x)
Copies of the Chronicle (xiii) 
Highlights in Books XV to XXI (xv)
   Secular History (xv)
   Ecclesiastical History (xix) 
   ‘Natural’ History (xxi)
Syriac Writing of Michael the Great (xxii)
Sources of Books XV to XXI (xxvi)
   Jacob of Edessa (died in 708) (xxvi)
   Dionysius of Tell-Maḥrē (died in 845) (xxvi)
   Basil Bar-Shumōnō (died in 1169) (xxvii)
   Dionysius (Bar-Ṣalībī) Bishop of Āmid (died in 1171) (xxvii)
   Patriarch John Bar-Shoshan (died in 1073) (xxviii)
   Joseph the Monk (mid-11th century) (xxviii)
   Ignatius Metropolitan of Melitene (died in 1094) (xxix)
   Evanius of Keshum (died in 1171) (xxix)
   Arabic Sources (xxix)
The Present Partial Edition (xxx)
Editorial Abbreviations (xxxi)

Text and Translation (1)
Book XV (2)
Book XVI (138) 
Book XVII (214) 
Book XVIII (312) 
[Book XIX (322)
Book XX (360)
Book XXI (408)

Bibliography (473)
Index (477)
Index of Biblical Quotations (477) 
Index of Personal Names (479) 
Index of Geographical Names (485) 
Subjects Index (489)

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