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The Coup of Jehoiada and the Fall of Athaliah


The Discourses and Textual Production of 2 Kings 11


The Coup of Jehoiada and the Fall of Athaliah explores the discursive and historiographical techniques used to incorporate 2 Kings 11 into the larger deuteronomistic history. More specifically, this book explores how and why the report of Athaliah’s execution was not incorporated into the deuteronomistic history the same way as other Ahabite death reports found in 1 Kings 14 – 2 Kings 10.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0577-5
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Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 14,2016
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 273
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0577-5
$95.00
$57.00

The Coup of Jehoiada and the Fall of Athaliah explores the discursive and historiographical techniques used to incorporate 2 Kings 11 into the larger deuteronomistic history. More specifically, this book explores how and why the report of Athaliah’s execution was not incorporated into the deuteronomistic history the same way as other Ahabite death reports found in 1 Kings 14 – 2 Kings 10. Approaching the text from a discourse critical perspective indicates that the report of Jehoiada’s coup and Athaliah’s execution in 2 Kings 11 was not initially a part of the deuteronomistic history. This analysis of the intertextuality and interdiscursivity of 2 Kings 11 shows that once the coup report was incorporated into the deuteronomistic history, it was successively redacted and reproduced in Late Monarchic Judah and Persian Period Yehud. The discourses that guided and constrained this process of textual production and reproduction were mainly concerned with Joash’s dynastic legitimacy and the legitimacy of the Jerusalem-centered Yahweh cult. As a result, Athaliah’s Israelite heritage and her short period of rule in Jerusalem had to be delegitimized.

The Coup of Jehoiada and the Fall of Athaliah explores the discursive and historiographical techniques used to incorporate 2 Kings 11 into the larger deuteronomistic history. More specifically, this book explores how and why the report of Athaliah’s execution was not incorporated into the deuteronomistic history the same way as other Ahabite death reports found in 1 Kings 14 – 2 Kings 10. Approaching the text from a discourse critical perspective indicates that the report of Jehoiada’s coup and Athaliah’s execution in 2 Kings 11 was not initially a part of the deuteronomistic history. This analysis of the intertextuality and interdiscursivity of 2 Kings 11 shows that once the coup report was incorporated into the deuteronomistic history, it was successively redacted and reproduced in Late Monarchic Judah and Persian Period Yehud. The discourses that guided and constrained this process of textual production and reproduction were mainly concerned with Joash’s dynastic legitimacy and the legitimacy of the Jerusalem-centered Yahweh cult. As a result, Athaliah’s Israelite heritage and her short period of rule in Jerusalem had to be delegitimized.

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Contributor Biography

Clayton Bench

Clayton Bench holds a B.A. in Middle East History/Modern Hebrew from the University of Utah, an M.A. in Biblical Studies from the University of London, King's College London, and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from the University of Alberta. Clayton Currently teaches in the Department of Humanities/Religious Studies at the University of Texas El Paso (UTEP).

Table of Contents (v)

Acknowledgments (ix)

Preface (xi)

Abbreviations (xiii)

1. Introduction (1)

The Role of Prophets in Israel versus Judah (3)

Genealogy and Oracle in 2 Kings 11 (3)

Discourse Analysis (4)

Doing Discourse Analysis (8)

Discourse Practice: Intertextuality (9)

Discourse Practice: Interdiscursivity (10)

Textual Analysis (11)

Social Practice (11)

Discourse Analysis and 2 Kings 11 (13)

2. The Interdiscursive Nature of 2 Kings 11 and its Effect on Perceptions about Athaliah (15)

The Genre of 2 Kings 11 (17)

Other Genres Significant for Understanding  2 Kings 11 (20)

Activity Types, Styles, and Rhetoric in 2 Kings 11 (21)

A Typology of Coup and Coup Reports (25)

The Innovations of 2 Kings 11 in Comparison with other Military Palace Coup Reports (31)

Prophetic Oracles and Coups in the Hebrew Bible (33)

Interdiscursivity, Intertextuality, Textual Production, and 2 Kings 11 (37)

Coup d’Etat in the Hebrew Bible (39)

3. Textual Analysis, Constitution of Identity and Worldview in 2 Kings 11  (45)

The Control of Communicative Events in  2 Kings 11 (47)

Textual Cohesion and 2 Kings 11—Elaboration, Extension, and Enhancement (48)

Cohesive Clausal Functions (Elaboration, Extension, and Enhancement), Explicit Cohesive Markers (reference, ellipsis, conjunction, and lexical cohesion), and the Rhetorical Modes of 2 Kings 11 (49)

Bourdieu, the Rules of Politeness, and 2 Kings 11 (50)

Ethos, Social Identity, and 2 Kings 11 (51)

Dimensions of Clausal Grammar: Transitivity, Theme, and Modality (52)

2 Kings 11 and Modality: Auxiliary Constructions, Verbal Tense, and Adverbial Constructions (55)

Key Words and their Meaning in 2 Kings 11 (56)

Wording, Interpretation, and Ideological Bias in 2 Kings 11 (56)

Conclusion (60)

4. Manifest Intertextuality and 2 Kings 11 (63)

Introduction (63)

Summary of Manifest Intertextuality in 2 Kings 11 (65)

Authoritative objects in 2 Kings 11 and Manifest Intertextuality: The Spears and Shields belonging to David (65)

5. Oracular Intertextuality, Genealogy, and Regnal Reports Related to Joash and Athaliah (75)

On Genealogy (77)

Genealogical Statements about Athaliah: Marginalizing, Splitting, or Pruning? (78)

Genealogical Statements about Joash (88)

Oracle and Promise: The Oracle of Nathan and its Discursive Role in the Genealogies of Joash and Athaliah (96)

Oracle and Conspiracy: The Oracle Traditions of Ahijah, Jehu son of Hanani, Elijah, Micaiah, and Elisha (101)

Conspiracy and Covenant (110)

Conclusion (112)

6. Conclusion (117)

Bibliography (121)

Appendices (135)

Appendix A: Kaige, Lucian, r/700, 2 Chr 22:10–23:21 (135)

Appendix B: MSS borc2e2/Rahlfs no. 19, 82, 700, 127, 93 (148)

Appendix C: Historical Critical Analyses of 2 Kings 11 (152)

Introduction (152)

The Two Source Theory (153)

Wellhausen on 2 Kings 11:6—Trebolle-Barrera on 2 Kings 11:9–10 (157)

Form Critical Issues (170)

Genre Critical Issues: 2 Kings 11 as Saga, Historical Narrative or Historiography (174)

2 Kings 11 as Propaganda (175)

Redaction Critical Issues (180)

Recent Redaction Critical Analyses (183)

Gender Critical Issues (186)

Historical Issues (190)

Hypotheses about Royal Inscriptions and the Coup of Jehoiada/Enthronement of Joash (192)

External Sources that Have Implications for Understanding the Oracle Traditions Associated with Ahabites (194)

The Kurkh Monolith: An Inscription of Shalmaneser III,  853–845 BCE  (195)

The Tel Dan Inscription/Stele of Hazael (199)

Conclusion: The Relationship Between Historical Analyses and the Consensus View in Literary Analyses (206)

Source Critical Conclusions (206)

Discursive Tension: Palace and Temple (208)

Discursive Tension: Verbal Disagreement (208)

Discursive Tension: The Necessity for Explicitly Davidic Symbols (209)

Appendix D: The History and Aims of Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible and an In-depth Textual Critical Analysis of 2 King 11 (216)

Textual Critical Analyses of 2 Kings 11 (216)

The Role of Textual Criticism (218)

The Aims of Textual Criticism (219)

Two Types of Textual Criticism (220)

The Role of Textual Witnesses in the Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (224)

The Jewish Revisions/Recensions (227)

Origen’s Hexapla (228)

Post-Hexapla Revisions of the Greek Translations (229)

Review of Textual Critical Analyses of 2 Kings 11:1–20 and Outcomes Verse-by-Verse (230)

Approaches to the Text of 2 Kings 11: Verse-by-Verse (232)

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