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Although written before the modern discoveries that define Ancient Near Eastern studies today, Paton’s historic foray into the history of Syria and Palestine served to start a continuing discussion that remains active today. Covering the Babylonian, Aramaean, Egyptian, Hittite, and Assyrian empires, Paton demonstrates what was known of the history of the region with the limited resources of nineteenth-century explorations.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-244-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: May 12,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 342
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-244-4
$189.12
$113.48

Written before many of the discoveries that have shaped modern Ancient Near Eastern studies surfaced, Paton was an early explorer of the history of the biblical world. Beginning as far back as turn-of-the-twentieth-century knowledge reached, he explained what was known of the earliest inhabitants of the regions of Syria and Palestine. Informed by the then recent discoveries of Mesopotamian archives, he describes the Old Babylonian days of supremacy and the migration of the Amorites into the region. Focusing on the famed city of Babylon, Paton demonstrates its historical significance. Tracing the migration of the Canaanites, then the period of Egyptian hegemony over the region, the author is now poised to incorporate the Hittites and the Aramaean migration and the consequent rise of their state. Now close to the biblical period, the judges of the Bible are given consideration, as are the kings of Israel and Judah. Naturally the account moves on to the encroachment and rise of Assyria and comes to a conclusion with the Neo-Babylonian empire. Written in a period when the fresh blush of new discovery was in the air, Paton’s account, if not always historically correct, remains a testament to the early days of an emerging field of study that specialist and generalists alike will find fascinating.

Lewis Bayles Paton (1864-1932) was a prominent biblical scholar of his day. He studied at New York University and Princeton. He taught at Hartford Theological Seminary in Connecticut.

Written before many of the discoveries that have shaped modern Ancient Near Eastern studies surfaced, Paton was an early explorer of the history of the biblical world. Beginning as far back as turn-of-the-twentieth-century knowledge reached, he explained what was known of the earliest inhabitants of the regions of Syria and Palestine. Informed by the then recent discoveries of Mesopotamian archives, he describes the Old Babylonian days of supremacy and the migration of the Amorites into the region. Focusing on the famed city of Babylon, Paton demonstrates its historical significance. Tracing the migration of the Canaanites, then the period of Egyptian hegemony over the region, the author is now poised to incorporate the Hittites and the Aramaean migration and the consequent rise of their state. Now close to the biblical period, the judges of the Bible are given consideration, as are the kings of Israel and Judah. Naturally the account moves on to the encroachment and rise of Assyria and comes to a conclusion with the Neo-Babylonian empire. Written in a period when the fresh blush of new discovery was in the air, Paton’s account, if not always historically correct, remains a testament to the early days of an emerging field of study that specialist and generalists alike will find fascinating.

Lewis Bayles Paton (1864-1932) was a prominent biblical scholar of his day. He studied at New York University and Princeton. He taught at Hartford Theological Seminary in Connecticut.

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Lewis Paton

  • CONTENTS (page 7)
  • INTRODUCTION (page 9)
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY1 (page 20)
  • SYRIA AND PALESTINE (page 37)
  • CHAPTER III THE AMORITIC MIGRATION (page 59)
  • CHAPTER IV THE RULE OF THE CITY OF BABYLON (page 79)
  • CHAPTER V THE CANAANITIC MIGRATION (page 95)
  • CHAPTER VI THE EGYPTIAN SUPREMACY (page 106)
  • CHAPTER VII THE HITTITE AND THE ARAMAEAN MIGRATION (page 139)
  • CHAPTER VIII THE RISE OF THE ARAMAEAN NATIONS (page 158)
  • CHAPTER IX THE PERIOD OF THE HEBREW JUDGES (page 195)
  • CHAPTER X THE PERIOD OF THE EARLY HEBREW KINGS (page 214)
  • CHAPTER XI THE ADVANCE OF THE ASSYRIA (page 237)
  • CHAPTER XII THE ASSYRIAN SUPREMACY (page 269)
  • CHAPTER XIII THE NEW BABYLONIAN SUPREMACY (page 311)
  • INDEX (page 323)
  • INDEX TO OLD TESTAMENT REFERENCES (page 340)