Close
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters
The appearance is given in the Roman text, Historia Naturalis, that the Seres were a people who imported iron and silk to Rome from China. However, an agreement has never been reached as to the exact origin of this people.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-016-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 722
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 20
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-016-5
$34.00
$20.40

In an encyclopedia of the Roman Empire compiled by Pliny (Historia Naturalis), there is a passage that discusses metals. He states that the Seres brought with them iron, fabrics, and skins. Although there are several references to the Seres, there is no other passage in which the Seres and iron are brought together. However, upon this slight authority rests the assumption that steel was brought to imperial Rome from China. The iron industry of China assumed important aspects throughout the centuries. The first accurate information concerning China was supplied by the author of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea. It is learned from this author that many items came tom Rome from a city in China in which silk, furs, and iron were brought to various points on the West coast of India. The making of steel in early India has been fully described, the methods ascertained, and the sources of the industry located. As a result, the various references to the Seres in Roman texts cannot be harmonized for any one people and it is certainly an unnecessary interpretation to identify them with the Chinese.

In an encyclopedia of the Roman Empire compiled by Pliny (Historia Naturalis), there is a passage that discusses metals. He states that the Seres brought with them iron, fabrics, and skins. Although there are several references to the Seres, there is no other passage in which the Seres and iron are brought together. However, upon this slight authority rests the assumption that steel was brought to imperial Rome from China. The iron industry of China assumed important aspects throughout the centuries. The first accurate information concerning China was supplied by the author of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea. It is learned from this author that many items came tom Rome from a city in China in which silk, furs, and iron were brought to various points on the West coast of India. The making of steel in early India has been fully described, the methods ascertained, and the sources of the industry located. As a result, the various references to the Seres in Roman texts cannot be harmonized for any one people and it is certainly an unnecessary interpretation to identify them with the Chinese.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor

Wilfred Schoff

  • The Eastern Iron Trade of the Roman Empire (page 5)
Customers who bought this item also bought

The Nomocanonical Literature of the Copto-Arabic Church of Alexandria

ISBN: 978-1-61719-188-6
Nomocanons (manuals of law) in Eastern Christianity give insights into the whole civil and religious life of communities, families and individuals. Nomocanonical literature is particularly abundant in the Coptic tradition, and the Rev. Franz Joseph Cöln describes five Nomocanons of the Coptic Church with a short account of their contents.
$81.60