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The Exodus Commentary of St Ephrem


A fourth century Syriac commentary on the book of Exodus


This commentary on Exodus by the highly influential fourth century Syriac writer St. Ephrem, is typical of his exegetical approach, particularly the emphasis on women in the narrative and the similarities to contemporary Jewish interpretations.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-808-3
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Moran Etho 8
Publication Date: Apr 5,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 59
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-808-3
$43.00
$25.80

Known mainly for his dazzling theological poetry, the Syriac writer St Ephrem also produced commentaries on the Diatessaron (Gospel Harmony) and the books of Genesis and Exodus that were of great influence on the work of later generations of Syriac writers. That on Exodus is easily the shortest (it may represent lecture notes taken down by a disciple of Ephrem), but it shares two prominent features with the much longer Genesis commentary, namely a strong interest in the female characters of the biblical narrative, and many parallels with Jewish biblical interpretation of the same period. Probably dating from the third quarter of the fourth century and written in Edessa (modern Urfa in south east Turkey), this represents the earliest surviving Syriac commentary on Exodus. This modern English translation of the work is a revised edition of an earlier publication, including notes on the rendering, biblical references, and Jewish parallels to Ephrem’s interpretation.

Known mainly for his dazzling theological poetry, the Syriac writer St Ephrem also produced commentaries on the Diatessaron (Gospel Harmony) and the books of Genesis and Exodus that were of great influence on the work of later generations of Syriac writers. That on Exodus is easily the shortest (it may represent lecture notes taken down by a disciple of Ephrem), but it shares two prominent features with the much longer Genesis commentary, namely a strong interest in the female characters of the biblical narrative, and many parallels with Jewish biblical interpretation of the same period. Probably dating from the third quarter of the fourth century and written in Edessa (modern Urfa in south east Turkey), this represents the earliest surviving Syriac commentary on Exodus. This modern English translation of the work is a revised edition of an earlier publication, including notes on the rendering, biblical references, and Jewish parallels to Ephrem’s interpretation.

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Contributor Biography

Alison G. Salvesen

Alison Salvesen is Polonsky Fellow in Jewish Bible Versions at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, and a University Research Lecturer at the Oriental Institute, University of Oxford. Her interests are in early Jewish and Christian translations and exegesis of the Bible.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Introduction (page 7)
  • Bibliography (page 11)
  • Texts and translations (page 11)
  • General (page 13)
  • The Version of Exodus, The Second Book of the Law, Made by the Blessed Mar Ephrem (page 15)
  • Synopsis (page 15)
  • Section I (page 17)
  • Section II (page 19)
  • Section III (page 25)
  • Section IV (page 27)
  • Section V (page 30)
  • Section VI (page 31)
  • Section VII (page 31)
  • Section VIII (page 33)
  • Section IX (page 34)
  • Section X (page 35)
  • Section XI (page 37)
  • Section XII (page 37)
  • Section XIII (page 40)
  • Section XIV (page 40)
  • Section XV. Moses' Song of Praise (page 43)
  • Section XVI (page 46)
  • Section XVII (page 47)
  • Section XVIII (page 49)
  • Section XIX (page 51)
  • Section XX (page 51)
  • Section XXI-XXII (page 53)
  • Section XXIII (page 53)
  • Section XXIV (page 54)
  • Section XXV-XXXI (page 55)
  • Section XXXII (page 56)
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