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A fascinating study of the underlying reasons for the disagreement over the clause “and the Son” in the Western version of the Niceno-Constantinopolitan creed, which contributed to the schism between Eastern and Western Christians. Coetzee argues that there has been a great deal of misunderstanding of the positions of each tradition by the other, partly due to the fact that East and West imbue certain key words, such as ‘person’ and ‘unity’, with different meanings which Coetzee believes come from different understandings of Hellenic philosophy. Against this backdrop, Coetzee sets about clearing up some of the misunderstandings.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0403-7
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Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jul 4,2014
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 286
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0403-7
$99.00

Michelle Coetzee focuses on the underlying causes of the filioque impasse, which remains one of the greatest obstacles to the re-establishment of communion between the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics. She argues that there has been a great deal of misunderstanding of the positions of each tradition by the other, partly due to the fact that East and West imbue certain key words, such as ‘person’ and ‘unity’, with different meanings. Underlying this difficulty is the problem of divergent approaches to theology, leading to differing responses to the Church’s interaction with ancient Hellenic philosophy back in the fourth century and consequently to divergent expositions of the Trinity. Against this backdrop, Coetzee sets about clearing up some of the misunderstandings. But choices still need to be made and, in Coetzee’s view, these must ultimately be made on the basis of approach to theology and truth criteria.

Michelle Coetzee focuses on the underlying causes of the filioque impasse, which remains one of the greatest obstacles to the re-establishment of communion between the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics. She argues that there has been a great deal of misunderstanding of the positions of each tradition by the other, partly due to the fact that East and West imbue certain key words, such as ‘person’ and ‘unity’, with different meanings. Underlying this difficulty is the problem of divergent approaches to theology, leading to differing responses to the Church’s interaction with ancient Hellenic philosophy back in the fourth century and consequently to divergent expositions of the Trinity. Against this backdrop, Coetzee sets about clearing up some of the misunderstandings. But choices still need to be made and, in Coetzee’s view, these must ultimately be made on the basis of approach to theology and truth criteria.

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Contributor Biography

Michelle Coetzee

Michelle Coetzee is a doctoral student at St Augustine College in Victory Park, Johannesburg, South Africa. She holds a Performers Diploma in Speech and Drama from the University of Cape Town, a B.Th (cum laude) from the University of South Africa and an M.Phil. Theology (cum laude) from St Augustine College. A former actress and award-winning playwright, she now supports herself by working as a sub-editor at a Johannesburg newspaper.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Foreword (page 9)
  • Preface (page 11)
  • Acknowledgments (page 13)
  • Abbreviations (page 15)
  • Introduction (page 17)
  • 1 The filioque: meaning and arguments (page 21)
    • 1.i Historical background (page 21)
    • 1.ii. Meaning and objections (page 23)
    • 1.iii. Scriptural evidence (page 24)
      • 1.iii.a. Western arguments (page 24)
      • 1.iii.b. Orthodox argument (page 26)
    • 1.iv. Economic and immanent Trinity (page 29)
      • 1.iv.a. Western view (page 29)
      • 1.iv.b. Eastern perspective (page 30)
    • 1.v. Proof texts from the Fathers (page 32)
    • 1.vi. Theological argumentation (page 34)
      • 1.vi.a. West: The Divine Persons are relations oforigin (page 34)
      • 1.vi.b. The person in Orthodox thought (page 41)
    • 1.vii. Summary (page 48)
  • 2 Untangling the arguments (page 53)
    • 2.i. Orthodox objections premised on three real Persons (page 53)
    • 2.ii. Western Clarification (page 57)
    • 2.iii. Analysis (page 60)
    • 2.iv. Western objections to the Orthodox model (page 69)
    • 2.v. Summary (page 75)
  • 3 The Eastern approach to truth (page 77)
    • 3.i. Ancient philosophy and the Logos approach (page 78)
      • 3.i.a. Justin Martyr (page 82)
      • 3.i.b. Origen (c. 185…254) (page 83)
    • 3.ii. Truth as communion (page 87)
      • 3.ii.a. The mystical, apophatic approach (page 88)
      • 3.ii.b The Eucharistic approach (page 96)
      • 3.ii.c Being as communion (page 98)
    • 3.iii. Summary (page 104)
  • 4 Perception and conception in Orthodox thought (page 107)
    • 4.i. Mysticism, polemics and language (page 107)
      • 4.i.a Direct encounters with God (page 107)
      • 4.i.b Mysticism and polemics (page 112)
      • 4.i.c Implications for language (page 113)
    • 4.ii. Patristic origins of the Orthodox view of personhood (page 118)
      • 4.ii.a Personhood and monism (page 118)
      • 4.ii.b. The monarchy of the Father (page 121)
      • 4.ii.c. Truth is the Person in communion (page 125)
      • 4.ii.d Relationship between human and divinepersons (page 128)
    • 4.iii. Summary (page 131)
  • 5 The indivisible Trinity (page 133)
    • 5.i. Three self-conscious Persons? (page 133)
    • 5.ii. The meaning of Personhood (page 135)
    • 5.iii. The paradigm of love (page 140)
    • 5.iv. Three minds? (page 142)
    • 5.v. Three wills? (page 151)
    • 5.vi. Subordination of the Son and the Spirit? (page 154)
    • 5.vii. Summary (page 157)
  • 6 The procession of the Spirit (page 161)
    • 6.i. Economic and immanent Trinity (page 161)
    • 6.ii. Modes of being (page 164)
    • 6.iii. The procession of the Spirit (page 166)
    • 6.iv. Summary (page 178)
    • 6.v. Comments: Orthodox objections to the filioque (page 181)
  • 7 Origins of the Western conception (page 185)
    • 7.i. Augustines mystical experience and approach (page 185)
    • 7.ii. Augustine and Hellenic philosophy (page 191)
    • 7.iii. The influence of other ecclesial writers (page 193)
      • 7.iii.a. Subordinationism (page 194)
      • 7.iii.b. Confusion of sending and proceeding (page 196)
    • 7.iv. Notion of truth … the economic Trinity reveals theimmanent Trinity (page 197)
    • 7.v. Summary (page 208)
  • 8 Unity to filioque (page 211)
    • 8.i. Augustines appropriation Nicaea I (page 212)
      • 8.i.a. The divine oneness (page 212)
      • 8.i.b. Augustines understanding of substance (page 214)
    • 8.ii. Constantinople I: Person and hypostasis (page 220)
    • 8.iii. Augustines solution (page 224)
    • 8.iv. The filioque (page 228)
      • 8.iv.a. Filioque mooted (page 228)
      • 8.iv.b. The Spirit as Gift (page 229)
    • 8.v. Summary (page 233)
  • 9 Augustines psychological analogies (page 235)
    • 9.i. Augustines analogies (page 235)
      • 9.i.a. Augustines analogies and Neoplatonicthought (page 238)
      • 9.i.b. Substantive relations and Augustinesanalogies (page 239)
      • 9.ii. Analysis (page 241)
        • 9.ii.a. Starting with the Substance (page 241)
        • 9.ii.b. Mere relations? (page 242)
        • 9.ii.c. Contingent objections (page 247)
      • 9.iii. The heart of the matter … the paradigm of love (page 252)
        • 9.iii.a. The attributes appropriated as internalrelations (page 252)
        • 9.iii.b. The analogies and Neoplatonism (page 254)
      • 9.iv. Summary (page 257)
  • 10 Conclusion (page 263)
  • Bibliography (page 273)
    • Books (page 273)
    • Journal articles (page 275)
    • Internet sources (page 276)
  • Index (page 281)
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