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The Galatia of Saint Paul and the Galatic Territory of the Book of Acts


Ramsay makes a strong case for the southern location of the Galatia mentioned in the New Testament. Using several streams of evidence, Ramsay makes a forceful case for the South-Galatian theory.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 1-59333-488-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 10
Publication Date: Nov 1,2006
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 52
ISBN: 1-59333-488-5
$42.00
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Taking head-on the question of the location of the “Galatia” of Paul’s letter and the “Galatic territory” mentioned in Acts, Ramsay lays forth the evidence for the South-Galatian theory. He brings ancient opinion from the patristic period, the Roman use of the terms “Galatia” and “Galatae,” and the specific place names within the region to bear on this vexed question. Directly facing the historical standpoint of the North-Galatian theory, Ramsay offers many challenging objections to this outlook. A splendid example of scholarly debate, this essay has earned a place in all future discussion of the issue.

Sir William Mitchell Ramsay (1851-1939) held the first Professorship of Classical Archaeology at Oxford University. He later returned to his alma mater to become Professor of Humanity at Aberdeen University. An archaeologist as well as a New Testament scholar, he traveled widely in Turkey and wrote about its place in the Bible.

Taking head-on the question of the location of the “Galatia” of Paul’s letter and the “Galatic territory” mentioned in Acts, Ramsay lays forth the evidence for the South-Galatian theory. He brings ancient opinion from the patristic period, the Roman use of the terms “Galatia” and “Galatae,” and the specific place names within the region to bear on this vexed question. Directly facing the historical standpoint of the North-Galatian theory, Ramsay offers many challenging objections to this outlook. A splendid example of scholarly debate, this essay has earned a place in all future discussion of the issue.

Sir William Mitchell Ramsay (1851-1939) held the first Professorship of Classical Archaeology at Oxford University. He later returned to his alma mater to become Professor of Humanity at Aberdeen University. An archaeologist as well as a New Testament scholar, he traveled widely in Turkey and wrote about its place in the Bible.

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W. Ramsay