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Lester B. Holland, professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, addresses the puzzle of Doric entablature, suggesting that the persistence of the form of the entablature is due to its mimicry of earlier fortifications.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-442-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 213
Publication Date: Aug 4,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 43
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-442-4
$39.00
$23.40

Lester B. Holland, professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, addresses the puzzle of Doric entablature . The Greeks used this form continuously for a period of over four hundred years without showing the slightest variation in the arrangement of regulae, taenia, triglyphs, metopes, mutules, and corona, or even in the number and disposition of the guttae, and with practically no change in the relative proportions of these parts, is a fact unparalleled in architectural history. Holland suggests that this lack of variation in a situation where there is no structural need for the form to remain constant stems from its origin in the crenelation of defensive walls. This argument provides intriguing suggestions of the connection between the Mycenaean megaron and the classical temple, showing how architectural remains can illuminate larger cultural movements.

Lester B. Holland, professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, addresses the puzzle of Doric entablature . The Greeks used this form continuously for a period of over four hundred years without showing the slightest variation in the arrangement of regulae, taenia, triglyphs, metopes, mutules, and corona, or even in the number and disposition of the guttae, and with practically no change in the relative proportions of these parts, is a fact unparalleled in architectural history. Holland suggests that this lack of variation in a situation where there is no structural need for the form to remain constant stems from its origin in the crenelation of defensive walls. This argument provides intriguing suggestions of the connection between the Mycenaean megaron and the classical temple, showing how architectural remains can illuminate larger cultural movements.

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Contributor

Leicester Holland

  • THE ORIGIN OF THE DORIC ENTABLATURE [PLATE VII] (page 5)