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This work explores the misconceptions about the Ottoman Süryânî community of the pre-World War I era, using a critique of the present day historiography as the context for the discussion. The works of three early twentieth century journalists, provide the material for the study. The author contends that this group cannot be considered as Assyrian nationalists, the traditional argument, that they saw the future of the Süryânî people as best secured by the continuation of the Ottoman Empire, in which they sought a greater presence for their community.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-069-3
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: May 6,2013
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 256
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-069-3
$180.00

This work explores the misconceptions pertaining to the Ottoman Süryânî community of the pre-World War I era, using a critique of the present day historiography as the context for the discussion. The works of three early twentieth century journalists, Âşûr Yûsuf in Harput, Cebbûr Boyacı in New York and Naûm Fâik in Diyarbakır, provide the material for the study. The author contends that these individuals cannot be considered as Assyrian nationalists, the traditional argument, and, furthermore, that they saw the future of the Süryânî people as best secured by the continuation of the Ottoman Empire, in which they sought a greater presence for their community.

The hopes of the Süryânî lived and died with their belief in the İttihâd ve Terakkî Cemiyeti [Committee of Union and Progress]. The rise of autocratic rule and then the killings of Christians during the First World War proved that these hopes had been misplaced, but the story of the Süryânî journalists years prior to the war will come as a surprise to those familiar only with the histories of genocide. This is the first work to examine the body of Süryânî writing in Ottoman Turkish and as such offers a previously unavailable look at this community and its place in Ottoman society.

This work explores the misconceptions pertaining to the Ottoman Süryânî community of the pre-World War I era, using a critique of the present day historiography as the context for the discussion. The works of three early twentieth century journalists, Âşûr Yûsuf in Harput, Cebbûr Boyacı in New York and Naûm Fâik in Diyarbakır, provide the material for the study. The author contends that these individuals cannot be considered as Assyrian nationalists, the traditional argument, and, furthermore, that they saw the future of the Süryânî people as best secured by the continuation of the Ottoman Empire, in which they sought a greater presence for their community.

The hopes of the Süryânî lived and died with their belief in the İttihâd ve Terakkî Cemiyeti [Committee of Union and Progress]. The rise of autocratic rule and then the killings of Christians during the First World War proved that these hopes had been misplaced, but the story of the Süryânî journalists years prior to the war will come as a surprise to those familiar only with the histories of genocide. This is the first work to examine the body of Süryânî writing in Ottoman Turkish and as such offers a previously unavailable look at this community and its place in Ottoman society.

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ContributorBiography

Benjamin Trigona-Harany

Benjamin Trigona-Harany received his B.Sc. in Computer Science at Simon Fraser University in 2003, before completing his M.A. in Ottoman history at Bogaziçi University in 2008.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • List of Illustrations (page 7)
  • Preface (page 9)
  • Acknowledgments (page 11)
  • Transcription (page 13)
  • Introduction (page 15)
    • Terminology (page 18)
  • 1 Historical background (page 25)
    • Historiographical Debates (page 25)
      • Nationalism (page 26)
      • Oppresion and Genocide (page 33)
    • A History of the Syriac Churches (page 37)
      • Emergence (page 37)
      • Missionary Activities (page 44)
      • Population Distribution (page 49)
    • The Ottoman Empire: 1908 to 1914 (page 52)
      • Revolution and Counter-Revolution (page 52)
      • Ottomanism (page 55)
      • International Crises and Ottonman Christians (page 58)
    • Sources for the Study (page 61)
      • Syriac Journalism (page 61)
    • 2 The Ottoman Millet System (page 91)
      • The Armenian Millet (page 95)
      • The Orthodox Millet (page 102)
      • The Jewish Millet (page 106)
      • The Süryânî Millet (page 109)
        • Administration (page 109)
        • Social Participation (page 117)
    • 3 Identity in the Süryânî Press (page 127)
      • Vatan, Millet and Cemâat (page 127)
      • Süryânî, Âsûrî and Ârâmî (page 133)
      • Ottomans, Assyrians or Süryânî? (page 141)
    • 4 Intibâh or Hâb-i Gaflet (page 167)
      • The Role of the Church and the Role of the Laity (page 167)
      • Education and Progress (page 187)
      • Language (page 197)
    • 5 Süryânî Identity: a Reprise (page 209)
      • A Drop in the Sea (page 209)
      • The Süryânî Ottomans (page 220)
    • Appendix A: Orthography (page 227)
      • The Case of Zeytûn Kesîs (page 231)
    • Appendix B: Poetry of Naûm Fâik (page 233)
    • Appendix C: Poetry of Âsûr Yûsuf (page 235)
    • Appendix D: Photographs (page 239)
    • Bibliography (page 241)
      • Newspapers (page 241)
      • Secondary Sources (page 241)
    • Index (page 251)
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