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The Religion of the Achaemenian Kings

First Series. The Religion According to the Inscriptions


The author sets out to uncover more about the religion of the Achaemenian Kings and the Zoroastrian religion through many different kinds of ancient inscriptions and texts, both Persian and non-Persian.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-551-8
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 599
Publication Date: Jun 4,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 29
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-551-8
$36.00
Your price: $25.20

A.V. Williams Jackson attempts to uncover more about the religion of the Achaemenian Kings and the Zoroastrian religion. He does not expect to make all points clear connected with the Achaemenian faith, but he endeavors to bring together the material relating to the Achaemenian creed as fully as possible, and with a hope that perhaps some hints may be given with regard to the relation of the ancient Persian kings to Zoroastrianism. Williams Jackson does so by looking at information found in Old Persian inscriptions, such as Auramazda or the God of the Old Persian inscriptions, the Bagas or other gods besides Auramazda, Mithra and Anahita, Foy’s conjecture of Arstat, evil recognized as a principle in the Old Persian inscriptions, the commandment of Auramazda and the law, and religious observance and places of worship. He will also examine their religion according to non-Iranian inscriptions, classical allusions, allusions in the Pahlavi literature and Shah Namah, and other Oriental sources. All sources are needed to discover the truth, however Williams Jackson’s analysis did not produce many results.

A.V. Williams Jackson attempts to uncover more about the religion of the Achaemenian Kings and the Zoroastrian religion. He does not expect to make all points clear connected with the Achaemenian faith, but he endeavors to bring together the material relating to the Achaemenian creed as fully as possible, and with a hope that perhaps some hints may be given with regard to the relation of the ancient Persian kings to Zoroastrianism. Williams Jackson does so by looking at information found in Old Persian inscriptions, such as Auramazda or the God of the Old Persian inscriptions, the Bagas or other gods besides Auramazda, Mithra and Anahita, Foy’s conjecture of Arstat, evil recognized as a principle in the Old Persian inscriptions, the commandment of Auramazda and the law, and religious observance and places of worship. He will also examine their religion according to non-Iranian inscriptions, classical allusions, allusions in the Pahlavi literature and Shah Namah, and other Oriental sources. All sources are needed to discover the truth, however Williams Jackson’s analysis did not produce many results.

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Contributor

A.V. Williams Jackson

  • The Religion of the Achaemenian Kings (page 5)
  • Synopsis of the Treatment (page 6)
  • A. The Religion of the Achaemenians According to the Old Persian Inscriptions (page 7)
    • a. Introduction. (page 7)
    • b. Auramazda or the God of the Old Persian Inscriptions. (page 8)
    • c. The Bagas or Other Gods beside Auramazda. (page 13)
    • d. Mithra and Anahita. (page 14)
    • e. Foy's Conjecture of Arshtat (page 14)
    • f. Evil recognized as a Principle in the Old Persian Inscriptions (page 15)
    • g. The Right Path. (page 16)
    • h. The Commandment of Auramazda, and the Law. (page 17)
    • i. Religious Observance and Places of Worship (page 20)
    • j. Summary. (page 21)
  • B. The Religion of the Achaemenians According to their Non-Iranian Inscriptions (page 22)