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The Rivals of the Canonical Gospels


The Gospel History and Its Transmission


Originally delivered as one of the Jowett Lectures for 1906, the contents of this booklet emerged during the first quest for the historical Jesus. Somewhat surprisingly, Burkitt discovered that historical criticism increased the historical credibility of the Synoptic Gospels in his estimation. This ninth lecture in the series concerns itself with the non-canonical, or apocryphal gospels. Written before the discovery of the Nag-Hammadi library, this study considers the Testamentum Domini, Pistis Sophia, the Gospel and Apocalypse of St. Peter, the Protevangelium of James, the Infancy Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel According to the Hebrews, and the Oxyrhynchus Logia..
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-122-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 153
Publication Date: Feb 24,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 33
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-122-5
$37.00
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Originally delivered as one of the Jowett Lectures for 1906, the contents of this booklet emerged during the first quest for the historical Jesus. Somewhat surprisingly, Burkitt discovered that historical criticism increased the historical credibility of the Synoptic Gospels in his estimation. This ninth lecture in the series concerns itself with the non-canonical, or apocryphal gospels. Focusing at first on the post-crucifixion accounts, Burkitt notes that the Testamentum Domini is intended to substantial a particular ecclesiastical order. The Gnostic Pistis Sophia is another example of doctrine put into the mouth of post-resurrection Jesus. The Gospel and the Apocalypse of Saint Peter are next considered, followed by the Protevangelium of James and the Gospel of Thomas the Israelite. These likewise espouse theological rather than historical ideas. The Gospel According to the Hebrews and the Nazarean Gospel fall into a different type — those emphasizing the moral teachings. Burkitt ends this brief, pre-Nag Hammadi exploration with the Oxyrhynchus Logia and the implications of the historical aspect of the canonical Gospels on what has become historical Christianity.

Francis Crawford Burkitt (1864-1935) began his academic career as a student of mathematics. While at Cambridge University he moved to Divinity, becoming the Norrisian Professor. His interest in the text of the New Testament led him to study Syriac manuscripts and to publish widely in the field. He was a fellow of the British Academy.

Originally delivered as one of the Jowett Lectures for 1906, the contents of this booklet emerged during the first quest for the historical Jesus. Somewhat surprisingly, Burkitt discovered that historical criticism increased the historical credibility of the Synoptic Gospels in his estimation. This ninth lecture in the series concerns itself with the non-canonical, or apocryphal gospels. Focusing at first on the post-crucifixion accounts, Burkitt notes that the Testamentum Domini is intended to substantial a particular ecclesiastical order. The Gnostic Pistis Sophia is another example of doctrine put into the mouth of post-resurrection Jesus. The Gospel and the Apocalypse of Saint Peter are next considered, followed by the Protevangelium of James and the Gospel of Thomas the Israelite. These likewise espouse theological rather than historical ideas. The Gospel According to the Hebrews and the Nazarean Gospel fall into a different type — those emphasizing the moral teachings. Burkitt ends this brief, pre-Nag Hammadi exploration with the Oxyrhynchus Logia and the implications of the historical aspect of the canonical Gospels on what has become historical Christianity.

Francis Crawford Burkitt (1864-1935) began his academic career as a student of mathematics. While at Cambridge University he moved to Divinity, becoming the Norrisian Professor. His interest in the text of the New Testament led him to study Syriac manuscripts and to publish widely in the field. He was a fellow of the British Academy.

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F. Crawford Burkitt

  • CHAPTER X (page 5)