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Textual evidence regarding the ancient Near Eastern goddess Ishtar is carefully cataloged, transliterated and translated. This is a great resource for anyone interested in the languages and religions of the ancient Near East or Biblical Literature.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-851-0
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 40
Publication Date: Oct 31,2007
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 116
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-851-0
$57.00
$34.20

From the author of such notable works as The Royal Inscriptions of Sumer and Akkad, Studies in New Testament Christianity, Jesus of Nazareth: A Biography, and The Religion of Israel, The Semitic Ishtar Cult provides its reader with a collection of references to the ancient Near Eastern goddess Ishtar. The textual evidence is carefully cataloged, and references to Ishtar of Nineveh, Ishtar of Arbela, and Ishtar of Ashur are distinguished and compiled for ease of study. A transliteration and translation of each text is offered. This title is a great resource for the student or scholar interested in the languages and religions of the ancient Near East or Biblical Literature.

George Aaron Barton (1859-1942) taught at Haverford College, Bryn Mawr and the University of Pennsylvania where he was Professor of Semitic Languages from 1922-31 and Professor Emeritus from 1932-1942. His many articles and books cover a wide range of topics in areas such as biblical studies, religion, and linguistics. He was also involved in archaeological projects throughout the Middle East and was the director of the American School of Oriental Research in Baghdad from 1921-34.

From the author of such notable works as The Royal Inscriptions of Sumer and Akkad, Studies in New Testament Christianity, Jesus of Nazareth: A Biography, and The Religion of Israel, The Semitic Ishtar Cult provides its reader with a collection of references to the ancient Near Eastern goddess Ishtar. The textual evidence is carefully cataloged, and references to Ishtar of Nineveh, Ishtar of Arbela, and Ishtar of Ashur are distinguished and compiled for ease of study. A transliteration and translation of each text is offered. This title is a great resource for the student or scholar interested in the languages and religions of the ancient Near East or Biblical Literature.

George Aaron Barton (1859-1942) taught at Haverford College, Bryn Mawr and the University of Pennsylvania where he was Professor of Semitic Languages from 1922-31 and Professor Emeritus from 1932-1942. His many articles and books cover a wide range of topics in areas such as biblical studies, religion, and linguistics. He was also involved in archaeological projects throughout the Middle East and was the director of the American School of Oriental Research in Baghdad from 1921-34.

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Contributor Biography

George Barton

George Aaron Barton (1859-1942) author, scholar, and Professor of Semitic languages. He graduated from Haverford College, B.A., 1882 and M.A., 1885. Barton received his Ph.D., 1891 from Harvard. He taught at the Friends School (Providence, R.I.), 1884-1889; at Haverford College, 1889-1893; and at Bryn Mawr, 1899-1922. Barton was professor of Semitic languages at the University of Pennsylvania, 1922-1931 and Professor Emeritus, 1932-1942. He was also appointed director of the American School of Oriental Research in Baghdad, 1921-1934. Internationally known for his writings on Biblical subjects, he was also a noted scholar of archeology, helping appraise and interpret the findings of many archeological expeditions of the Middle East.