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The article refutes many of the arguments Stephen Henry Langdon made in his article on the text “The Sumerian Epic of Paradise, Flood, and Fall of Man”. The essay concludes with the entire text laid out and a commentary.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-031-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 516
Publication Date: Apr 30,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 29
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-031-5
$36.00
$21.60

Most of this article encloses a translation of a Sumerian text, first presented by Stephen Henry Langdon. The end of the essay contains a linguistic and phonological commentary. J. Dyneley Prince attempts to disprove many of the arguments made by Langdon in an article about “The Sumerian Epic of Paradise, Flood, and Fall of Man.” It involves a great flood which nearly wipes out man. This inscription also describes a ritual tendency of the Assyrians. The cult of the supreme deity, Ea, is at the center of this epic. The compiler of the text has used the annual drought in Mesopotamia and its subsequent relief by the annual floods as a background for which to build a special love of Ea. A lesson was contained in the epic that the flood must be controlled by a gardener who appears here as a special person, possibly semi-divine, working under the direction of Nintu, the mother of the land, but always with the consent of Ea.

Most of this article encloses a translation of a Sumerian text, first presented by Stephen Henry Langdon. The end of the essay contains a linguistic and phonological commentary. J. Dyneley Prince attempts to disprove many of the arguments made by Langdon in an article about “The Sumerian Epic of Paradise, Flood, and Fall of Man.” It involves a great flood which nearly wipes out man. This inscription also describes a ritual tendency of the Assyrians. The cult of the supreme deity, Ea, is at the center of this epic. The compiler of the text has used the annual drought in Mesopotamia and its subsequent relief by the annual floods as a background for which to build a special love of Ea. A lesson was contained in the epic that the flood must be controlled by a gardener who appears here as a special person, possibly semi-divine, working under the direction of Nintu, the mother of the land, but always with the consent of Ea.

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J. Dyneley Prince

  • The So-called Epic of Paradise. (page 5)