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The Sub-Loco Notes in the Former Prophets of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia


In BHS’s Masoretic apparatus, certain Masorah parva notes are marked “sub loco” in order to refer the reader to the corresponding commentary that was to be found in the third volume of Massorah Gedolah. Due to Weil’s passing, however, this commentary was never realized. This volume builds on Mynatt’s 1994 analysis and classification of the Pentateuch’s 297 sub loco notes by incorporating the Aleppo and Cairo Codices. Dost evaluates all 451 sub loco notes in the corpus of the Former Prophets, and evaluates Weil’s contribution by comparing Weil's revision of the Leningrad Codex’s Masorah against the Masorah of the Aleppo Codex.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0531-7
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Texts and Studies 12
Publication Date: Mar 21,2016
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 331
Languages: English, Hebrew
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0531-7
$194.54
$116.73

In preparing the Masorah of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS), Gérard E. Weil did not diplomatically present the Masorah of the Leningrad Codex (ML) as the editors of BHS did with ML’s text; rather, he opted to “complete,” “revise,” and “integrate” the text and Masorah of ML (BHS, xv). In BHS’s Masoretic apparatus, Weil marked certain Masorah parva notes “sub loco” in order to refer the reader to the corresponding commentary that was to be found in the third volume of Massorah Gedolah. Due to Weil’s passing, however, this commentary was never realized. A published analysis of BHS’s sub loco notes had to wait until Daniel S. Mynatt’s groundbreaking 1994 monograph, The Sub Loco Notes in the Torah of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, wherein he lists, analyzes, and classifies the Pentateuch’s 297 sub loco notes with a view to determining how and why BHS’s Mp differs from that of ML. Since that time, no analysis of the sub loco notes of the Prophets or the Writings has been published.

In this volume, Dost continues and methodologically advances Mynatt’s research by incorporating the Aleppo and Cairo Codices. After evaluating all 451 sub loco notes in the corpus of the Former Prophets, he evaluates Weil’s contribution by comparing Weil's revision of the Leningrad Codex’s Masorah against the Masorah of the Aleppo Codex.

In preparing the Masorah of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS), Gérard E. Weil did not diplomatically present the Masorah of the Leningrad Codex (ML) as the editors of BHS did with ML’s text; rather, he opted to “complete,” “revise,” and “integrate” the text and Masorah of ML (BHS, xv). In BHS’s Masoretic apparatus, Weil marked certain Masorah parva notes “sub loco” in order to refer the reader to the corresponding commentary that was to be found in the third volume of Massorah Gedolah. Due to Weil’s passing, however, this commentary was never realized. A published analysis of BHS’s sub loco notes had to wait until Daniel S. Mynatt’s groundbreaking 1994 monograph, The Sub Loco Notes in the Torah of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, wherein he lists, analyzes, and classifies the Pentateuch’s 297 sub loco notes with a view to determining how and why BHS’s Mp differs from that of ML. Since that time, no analysis of the sub loco notes of the Prophets or the Writings has been published.

In this volume, Dost continues and methodologically advances Mynatt’s research by incorporating the Aleppo and Cairo Codices. After evaluating all 451 sub loco notes in the corpus of the Former Prophets, he evaluates Weil’s contribution by comparing Weil's revision of the Leningrad Codex’s Masorah against the Masorah of the Aleppo Codex.

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Contributor

Christopher Dost

  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • Preface (page 9)
  • Common Abbreviations (page 11)
  • Chapter 1: Introduction (page 13)
    • The History of Sub Loco Scholarship (page 13)
    • Aim and Methodology (page 17)
    • Resources (page 22)
    • Layout of the Sub Loco Entries (page 24)
  • Chapter 2: Joshua (page 27)
  • Chapter 3: Judges (page 70)
  • Chapter 4: 1 Samuel (page 109)
  • Chapter 5: 2 Samuel (page 163)
  • Chapter 6: 1 Kings (page 219)
  • Chapter 7: 2 Kings (page 267)
  • Chapter 8: The Sub Loco Notes of the Sedarim (page 307)
  • Chapter 9: Conclusions (page 311)
    • A Taxonomy of the Sub Loco Notes in the Former Prophets (page 311)
      • Clarifications and Emendations of Frequency (page 312)
      • Clarifications of Context (page 314)
      • Text-Critical Notes (page 315)
      • Matching Errors (page 316)
      • Errors in BHK (page 317)
      • Standardizations (page 317)
      • Combinations of Two or More MpL Notes (page 317)
      • Unresolved (page 318)
    • A Comparison of Taxonomies (page 318)
    • Weil's Treatment of the Masorah: An Evaluation (page 320)
      • Emendations of Frequency (page 321)
      • Statements about Text Features (page 322)
      • Incorrect Context (page 322)
      • Text-Critical Notes (page 322)
      • Matching Errors (page 323)
      • BHK Notes (page 323)
      • Standardizations (page 323)
      • Completions of the Masorah (page 324)
      • Failure to Emend MpL (page 324)
    • The Reliability of the Sub Loco Notes in the Former Prophets of BHS (page 324)
  • Bibliography (page 8)
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