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Argument by the Norris Professor of Divinity at Cambridge that the spelling of the Syriac version of the Gospels should not be taken as authority for the original Aramaic names.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-469-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 894
Publication Date: May 27,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 36
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-469-9
$38.00
$22.80

Translation from Aramaic into Greek into Syriac is difficult; for example, the name of the father of Mordecai, also borne by a "ruler of the synagogue" in the Gospels, changes from Jair to Jaeiros to Jorarash, where the Syriac translator has erroneously taken the Greek inflectional ending to be part of the proper name. Professor Burkitt (Professor of Divinity, Cambridge University) refutes the theory that the Syriac translators had any special information on the people and placenames of the New Testament, any more than they do for the Book of Esther; therefore, the spelling of the Greek New Testament should not be changed to accord with the Syriac version, as some extremely distinguished translators have done. Among other substantive questions, this affects the location of Cana, Bethany, and even Nazareth.

Translation from Aramaic into Greek into Syriac is difficult; for example, the name of the father of Mordecai, also borne by a "ruler of the synagogue" in the Gospels, changes from Jair to Jaeiros to Jorarash, where the Syriac translator has erroneously taken the Greek inflectional ending to be part of the proper name. Professor Burkitt (Professor of Divinity, Cambridge University) refutes the theory that the Syriac translators had any special information on the people and placenames of the New Testament, any more than they do for the Book of Esther; therefore, the spelling of the Greek New Testament should not be changed to accord with the Syriac version, as some extremely distinguished translators have done. Among other substantive questions, this affects the location of Cana, Bethany, and even Nazareth.

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Contributor

F. Crawford Burkitt

  • THW SYRIAC FORMS OF NEW TESTAMENT PROPER NAMES (page 5)
  • APPENDICES (page 29)
  • INDEX (page 35)
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