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An excellent translation follows a critical essay, which argues that the Christian elements of the text do not point to a Christian author, but rather indicate that this work is a Christian recension of a Graeco-Jewish original.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-871-8
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 56
Publication Date: Oct 31,2007
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 250
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-871-8
$90.00
$54.00

The Testament of Solomon is the tale of King Solomon’s encounter with and subjugation of demons whom he subsequently engages in the construction of his temple. While beseeching the Lord Sabbaoth concerning his servant who has been attacked by the demon Ornias, Solomon is given a ring that endows its possessor with authority over the demons. It is through the power of this ring that Solomon comes to the aid of his servant and is able to command the demons to assist in the completion of the temple. Solomon’s dialogue with these demons reveals much concerning the demonology of Testament’s author and redactors. Herein a translation of the text is introduced with a critical essay concerning the religious provenance of the text. Through a careful analysis of possible Christian passages in the Testament Professor Conybeare argues that the Christian elements do not point to a Christian author. Instead, with comparison to the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, he suggests that both are Christian recensions of Graeco-Jewish originals.

Frederick Cornwallis Conybeare (1856-1924) was a British orientalist who wrote extensively on religious themes from biblical and Christian literature, especially matters related to Armenian Christian literature. He taught at Oxford University and authored such notable books as Myth, Magic, and Morals, History of New Testament Criticism, and The Life of Apollonius of Tyana.

The Testament of Solomon is the tale of King Solomon’s encounter with and subjugation of demons whom he subsequently engages in the construction of his temple. While beseeching the Lord Sabbaoth concerning his servant who has been attacked by the demon Ornias, Solomon is given a ring that endows its possessor with authority over the demons. It is through the power of this ring that Solomon comes to the aid of his servant and is able to command the demons to assist in the completion of the temple. Solomon’s dialogue with these demons reveals much concerning the demonology of Testament’s author and redactors. Herein a translation of the text is introduced with a critical essay concerning the religious provenance of the text. Through a careful analysis of possible Christian passages in the Testament Professor Conybeare argues that the Christian elements do not point to a Christian author. Instead, with comparison to the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, he suggests that both are Christian recensions of Graeco-Jewish originals.

Frederick Cornwallis Conybeare (1856-1924) was a British orientalist who wrote extensively on religious themes from biblical and Christian literature, especially matters related to Armenian Christian literature. He taught at Oxford University and authored such notable books as Myth, Magic, and Morals, History of New Testament Criticism, and The Life of Apollonius of Tyana.

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Contributor Biography

F. Conybeare

Frederick Cornwallis Conybeare (1856-1924)

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