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The authors present a detailed philological and linguistic comparison of two versions of The Prayer of Manasseh. Combing state-of-the-art computational tools together with traditional philology, the texts are compared at all linguistic levels, from their vocabulary up to their discursive structure, with a special emphasis on their morphology and syntax. The results are revealing not only for the question of the relationship between the two versions, but they also illuminate various debates pertaining to Syriac syntax.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0050-3
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Aug 3,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 279
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0050-3
$184.40
$110.64

‘The Prayer of Manasseh’, a beautiful penitential prayer attributed to King Manasseh of Judah, has had a rich and complex textual transmission. Amongst its Syriac textual witnesses, two main versions emerge: one appearing in the Peshitta and the Didascalia, and another in the Melkite Horologion. In this study, the authors present a detailed philological and linguistic comparison of these two versions. Combining state-of-the-art computational tools together with traditional philology the texts are compared at all linguistic levels, from their vocabulary up to their discursive structure, with a special emphasis on their morphology and syntax. The results are revealing not only for the question of the relationship between the two versions, but also illuminate various debates pertaining to Syriac syntax. Questions of a methodological nature regarding textual comparison using qualitative and quantitative techniques are addressed as well. Together with the thorough text-historical and tradition-historical introduction, the book is a natural companion for anyone interested in this remarkable prayer, as well for anyone interested in Syriac linguistics, literature and liturgy.

‘The Prayer of Manasseh’, a beautiful penitential prayer attributed to King Manasseh of Judah, has had a rich and complex textual transmission. Amongst its Syriac textual witnesses, two main versions emerge: one appearing in the Peshitta and the Didascalia, and another in the Melkite Horologion. In this study, the authors present a detailed philological and linguistic comparison of these two versions. Combining state-of-the-art computational tools together with traditional philology the texts are compared at all linguistic levels, from their vocabulary up to their discursive structure, with a special emphasis on their morphology and syntax. The results are revealing not only for the question of the relationship between the two versions, but also illuminate various debates pertaining to Syriac syntax. Questions of a methodological nature regarding textual comparison using qualitative and quantitative techniques are addressed as well. Together with the thorough text-historical and tradition-historical introduction, the book is a natural companion for anyone interested in this remarkable prayer, as well for anyone interested in Syriac linguistics, literature and liturgy.

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Contributor

Ariel Gutman

Wido van Peursen

  • Dedication (page 5)
  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • List of Tables (page 11)
  • List of Illustrations (page 13)
  • List of Figures (page 15)
  • List of Glosses (page 17)
  • Preface (page 19)
  • Chapter 1: Manasseh's Prayer and its place in the Syriac tradition (page 23)
    • 1.1 King Manasseh and his prayer (page 23)
    • 1.2 PrMan in the Didascalia (page 24)
    • 1.3 Other Greek and Latin witnesses to PrMan (page 28)
    • 1.4 The Hebrew version of PrMan (page 29)
    • 1.5 The Syriac textual witnesses (page 31)
    • 1.6 Two Syriac versions (Version A and B) (page 42)
    • 1.7 The superscription in version B (page 43)
    • 1.8 Byzantine manuscript illustrations (page 53)
    • The Milieu in which PrMan originated (page 59)
    • 1.10 PrMan in its Syriac contest (page 66)
  • Chapter 2: Grammatical Comparison (page 93)
    • 2.1 Introduction to the Comparative analysis (page 93)
    • 2.2 Methodology (page 98)
    • 2.3 Morphology and orthography (page 101)
    • 2.4 Phrase syntax (page 104)
    • 2.5 Clause syntax (page 117)
  • Chapter 3: Lexical Analysis (page 159)
    • 3.1 Case Study: Metanoia Terminology (page 159)
    • 3.2 Lexical Correspondences (page 165)
    • 3.3 Vocabulary counts (page 172)
  • Chapter 4: Discourse Arrangement (page 181)
    • 4.1 Method of the text hierarchical analysis (page 181)
    • 4.2 General outline of the structure of PrMan (page 182)
    • 4.3 Section 1 (page 183)
    • 4.4 The boundary between sections 2 and 3 (page 185)
    • 4.5 The boundary between sections 3 and 4 (page 186)
    • 4.6 the alignment of verses 9-10 (page 190)
    • 4.7 Section 5 (page 196)
  • Chapter 5: Variant Readings (page 199)
    • 5.1 Cross-similarities of manuscripts (page 200)
    • 5.2 Other variants (page 204)
  • Chapter 6: Conclusions (page 209)
    • 6.1 Methodology of the comparative analysis (page 209)
    • 6.2 Character of the differences (page 214)
    • 6.3 The two versions of the prayer of Manasseh (page 216)
  • A Text and Translation of the Two Versions (page 225)
  • B Transcription and Glossing of the Two Versions (page 233)
  • Index of Vreses (page 245)
  • Index of Authors (page 247)
  • Bibliography (page 253)