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The author attacks practices common in newer forms of education. He generally calls for a more conservative, less experimental, approach which emphasizes deep general knowledge. No formal method is offered to replace the broken system.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-180-3
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 802
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 19
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-180-3
$34.00
$20.40

While no theory is perfect, the author attacks certain education practices. Firstly, those who exaggerate the problems of existing systems and demand new ones ignore the fact that some past systems, imperfect they may be, can be used. Blindly following the past is better than blind experimentation. All human systems are imperfect; this fact should dampen any fever towards “mere capricious change.” The author disparages teachers for underperforming. Secondly, too many consider “practical utility” the only use for education. Rather, a strong foundation of so-called impractical knowledge enables the strong growth of practical techniques. The author questions “professional studies,” suggesting that a proper education requires many subjects as opposed to one at the expense of others. Thirdly, the author condemns “mere external regulations.” Parading students around does not enable parents to compare schools. Fourthly, some systems encourage superficial study as opposed to depth and accuracy. Fifthly, the author disparages overly metaphysical approaches as being too impractical. The author does not provide a replacement to current methods but offers points of contention: public versus private education, the value of classical learning in general education, and parental discipline.

While no theory is perfect, the author attacks certain education practices. Firstly, those who exaggerate the problems of existing systems and demand new ones ignore the fact that some past systems, imperfect they may be, can be used. Blindly following the past is better than blind experimentation. All human systems are imperfect; this fact should dampen any fever towards “mere capricious change.” The author disparages teachers for underperforming. Secondly, too many consider “practical utility” the only use for education. Rather, a strong foundation of so-called impractical knowledge enables the strong growth of practical techniques. The author questions “professional studies,” suggesting that a proper education requires many subjects as opposed to one at the expense of others. Thirdly, the author condemns “mere external regulations.” Parading students around does not enable parents to compare schools. Fourthly, some systems encourage superficial study as opposed to depth and accuracy. Fifthly, the author disparages overly metaphysical approaches as being too impractical. The author does not provide a replacement to current methods but offers points of contention: public versus private education, the value of classical learning in general education, and parental discipline.

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  • ART. II.- THEORIES OF EDUCATION (page 5)