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Tilkidom and the Ottoman Empire


The Letters of Gerald Fitzmaurice to George Lloyd, 1906-1915


Edited by G.R. Berridge
Tilkidom is the collection of letters written the chief translator at the British embassy in the Ottoman Empire to a fellow diplomat in the years prior to WWI.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-155-8
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Aug 11,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 182
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-155-8
$129.00
$77.40

Gerald Henry Fitzmaurice was chief translator at the British Embassy in Constantinople in the years prior to the First World War. His letters to George Llyod, a former honorary attaché at the embassy, have been transcribed and collected in this volume by G. R. Berridge, the author of the biography Gerald Fitzmaurice (1865-1939). Berridge is making available this correspondence to scholars of the late Ottoman Empire and its relations with Britain as they are rich in detail and insight. The word Tilkidom used by Fitzmaurice derives from the Turkish for ‘fox’ and refers to the stealthy advancement of British interests in the Ottoman Empire by the translator and his compatriots. The sixty-odd letters, annotated by Berridge for ease of understanding, show the British embassy’s role in Ottoman affairs.

Gerald Henry Fitzmaurice was chief translator at the British Embassy in Constantinople in the years prior to the First World War. His letters to George Llyod, a former honorary attaché at the embassy, have been transcribed and collected in this volume by G. R. Berridge, the author of the biography Gerald Fitzmaurice (1865-1939). Berridge is making available this correspondence to scholars of the late Ottoman Empire and its relations with Britain as they are rich in detail and insight. The word Tilkidom used by Fitzmaurice derives from the Turkish for ‘fox’ and refers to the stealthy advancement of British interests in the Ottoman Empire by the translator and his compatriots. The sixty-odd letters, annotated by Berridge for ease of understanding, show the British embassy’s role in Ottoman affairs.

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Contributor

G.R. Berridge

  • CONTENTS (page 7)
  • PREFACE (page 11)
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS (page 13)
  • 1906 (page 15)
  • 1907 (page 21)
  • 1908 (page 63)
  • 1909 (page 101)
  • 1910 (page 131)
  • 1912 (page 149)
  • 1915 (page 153)
  • GLOSSARY OF TURKISH WORDS,ABBREVIATIONS,AND PRIVATE WORDS AND PHRASES USED IN THE LETTERS AND ENDMATTER (page 159)
  • LIST OF PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE LETTERS (page 161)
  • LIST OF WORKS CITED (page 175)
  • INDEX (page 177)