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Authors of the Hebrew Bible had at least 17 different verbs which they could use to represent “leading” or “guiding” in the Hebrew Bible. What are these “verbs of leading” and how are they related to one another? Why did an author choose the particular “leading” verb he chose in a particular context? Every occurrence of a verb of leading in the Hebrew Bible is examined through the lens of semantic-role theory by assigning roles to each of the phrases typically used with the verbs. This study resolves some problem passages and supplements traditional lexicographical research.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-925-0
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Mar 1,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 324
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-925-0
$193.00
$115.80

Authors of the Hebrew Bible had at least 17 different verbs from which they could choose to represent the action of “leading” or “guiding” in the Hebrew Bible. What are these “verbs of leading” and how are they similar to and different from one another? Why were particular “leading” verbs chosen in particular contexts?

This study analyzes the verb class “verbs of leading” in the Hebrew Bible. Every occurrence of the verbs of leading in the Hebrew Bible is examined through the lens of semantic-role theory by assigning semantic roles (e.g., Agent, Object, Goal, Source, Path) to each of the phrases typically used with the verbs. The verb class “verbs of leading” is defined, distinguishing features between the particular verbs of leading are identified, and several problematic passages in the Bible are dealt with using insights from this analysis. Although scholars have given the study of individual Biblical Hebrew words, and especially verbs, a great amount of attention in lexicons, articles, and books, little study has been done on specific verb groups in the Hebrew Bible. This analysis provides a potential model for such work in the future.

Authors of the Hebrew Bible had at least 17 different verbs from which they could choose to represent the action of “leading” or “guiding” in the Hebrew Bible. What are these “verbs of leading” and how are they similar to and different from one another? Why were particular “leading” verbs chosen in particular contexts?

This study analyzes the verb class “verbs of leading” in the Hebrew Bible. Every occurrence of the verbs of leading in the Hebrew Bible is examined through the lens of semantic-role theory by assigning semantic roles (e.g., Agent, Object, Goal, Source, Path) to each of the phrases typically used with the verbs. The verb class “verbs of leading” is defined, distinguishing features between the particular verbs of leading are identified, and several problematic passages in the Bible are dealt with using insights from this analysis. Although scholars have given the study of individual Biblical Hebrew words, and especially verbs, a great amount of attention in lexicons, articles, and books, little study has been done on specific verb groups in the Hebrew Bible. This analysis provides a potential model for such work in the future.

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Contributor Biography

Daniel Leavins

Daniel Leavins is the Pastor of Young Adults at Immanuel Bible Church in Springfield, VA. He holds a Ph.D. in Semitic Languages from The Catholic University of America. His writings aim to bring together insights from the fields of Semitics, linguistics, and biblical studies.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Preface (page 11)
  • Acknowledgments (page 13)
  • Abbreviations (page 15)
  • Introduction (page 17)
  • 1. Methodology and Preliminary Considerations (page 21)
    • 1.1. Verb Meaning and Behavior (page 21)
    • 1.2. Other Work (page 22)
    • 1.3. Semantics (page 26)
      • 1.3.1. Structuralism (page 26)
      • 1.3.2. Interrelation of semantics and syntax (page 28)
    • 1.4. Methodology: Theoretical (page 29)
      • 1.4.1. Argument Structure (page 29)
      • 1.4.2. Semantic Role Theory (page 31)
    • 1.5. Verbs of Leading (page 47)
      • 1.5.1. Cook's model (page 47)
      • 1.5.2. Creason's model (page 48)
    • 1.6. Methodology: Practical (page 54)
    • 1.7. Structure of the Study (page 56)
    • 1.8. Goals (page 56)
  • 2. Class I Verbs of Leading (page 59)
    • 2.1. Introduction (page 59)
    • 2.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics of teh Verb Class as a Whole (page 60)
    • 2.3.Realization of the Argument Structure for the Verb Class as a Whole (page 60)
    • 2.4. Pairs and Sequences (page 62)
    • 2.5. The Qal of ??? (page 62)
      • 2.5.1. General Characteristics (page 62)
      • 2.5.2. Argument Structure Characteristics (page 63)
      • 2.5.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of teh Verb (page 64)
      • 2.5.4. Problem Passages (page 64)
      • 2.5.5. Distinguishing Features (page 66)
    • 2.6. The Hiphil of ??? (page 66)
      • 2.6.1. General Characteristics (page 66)
      • 2.6.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 67)
      • 2.6.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 68)
      • 2.6.4. Problem Passages (page 68)
      • 2.6.5. Distinguishing Features (page 74)
    • 2.7. The Qal of ??? (page 76)
      • 2.7.1. General Characteristics (page 76)
      • 2.7.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 76)
      • 2.7.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 78)
      • 2.7.5. Distinguishing Features (page 79)
    • 2.8. The Piel of ??? (page 80)
      • 2.8.1. General Characteristics (page 80)
      • 2.8.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 81)
      • 2.8.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 83)
      • 2.8.4. Problem Passages (page 83)
      • 2.8.5. Distinguishing Features (page 85)
    • 2.9. The Hiphil and Hophal of ??? (page 85)
      • 2.9.1. General Characteristics (page 85)
      • 2.9.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 86)
      • 2.9.3. Additional Features of teh Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 88)
      • 2.9.4. Problem Passages (page 88)
      • 2.9.5. Distinguishing Features (page 90)
    • 2.10. The Piel of ??? (page 90)
      • 2.10.1. General Characteristics (page 90)
      • 2.10.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 91)
      • 2.10.3 Additional Comments on the lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 91)
      • 2.10.4. Problem Passages (page 91)
      • 2.10.5. Distinguishing Features (page 95)
    • 2.11. Summary (page 95)
  • 3. Class II Verbs of Leading (page 97)
    • 3.1. The Qal of ??? (page 97)
    • 3.2. The Niphal of ??? (page 99)
    • 3.3. The Hiphil of ??? Functioning as a Verb of Leading (page 101)
      • 3.3.1. Argument Structure (page 101)
      • 3.3.2. Realization of the Argument Structure (page 102)
      • 3.3.3. Pairs and Sequences (page 103)
      • 3.3.4. Glosses and Further Discussion (page 104)
      • 3.3.5. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 108)
    • 3.4. The Hiphil of ??? when not Functioning as a Verb of Leading (page 108)
    • 3.5. Dubious Passages with the Hiphil of ??? (page 112)
    • 3.6. The Hiphil of ??? in the Septuagint (page 115)
    • 3.7. The Hophal of ??? (page 115)
    • 3.8. Summary (page 117)
  • 4. Class II Verbs of Leading ??? (page 119)
    • 4.1. The Qal of ??? (page 119)
    • 4.2. The hiphil of ??? Functioning as a Verb of Leading (page 120)
      • 4.2.1. Argument Structures (page 121)
      • 4.2.2. Realization of the Argument Structure (page 121)
      • 4.2.3. Pairs and Sequences (page 125)
      • 4.2.4. Glosses and Further Discussion (page 126)
      • 4.2.5. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 129)
    • 4.3. The Hiphil of ??? when not functioning as a verb or leading (page 129)
    • 4.4. The Hiphil of ??? in the Septuagint (page 133)
    • 4.5. The Hophal of ??? (page 133)
    • 4.6. Difficult Passages (page 134)
    • 4.7. Summary (page 139)
  • 5. Class II Verbs of Leading ??? (page 141)
    • 5.1. The Qal of ??? (page 141)
    • 5.2. The Hiphil of ??? as a Verb of Leading (page 142)
      • 5.2.1. Argument Structure (page 143)
      • 5.2.2. Realization of the Argument Structure (page 143)
      • 5.2.3. Pairs and Sequences (page 146)
      • 5.2.4. Glosses and Further Discussion (page 147)
      • 5.2.5. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 149)
    • 5.3. The Hiphil of ??? when not Functioning as a Verb of Leading (page 150)
    • 5.4. The Hiphil of ??? in the Septuagint (page 153)
    • 5.5. The Hophal of ??? (page 154)
    • 5.6. Difficult Passages (page 154)
    • 5.7. Summary (page 162)
  • 6. Class II Verbs of Leading ??? (page 163)
    • 6.1. The Qal of ??? (page 163)
    • 6.2. THe Hiphil of ??? as a Verb of Leading (page 164)
      • 6.2.1. Argumant Structure (page 165)
      • 6.2.2. Realization of the Argument Structure (page 165)
      • 6.2.3. Pairs and Sequences (page 169)
      • 6.2.4. Glosses and Further Discussion (page 170)
      • 6.2.5. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 173)
    • 6.3. The Hiphil of ??? when not Functioning as a Verb of Leading (page 174)
    • 6.4. The Hiphil of ??? in the Septuagint (page 178)
    • 6.5. The Hophal of ??? (page 179)
    • 6.6. Difficult Passages (page 180)
    • 6.7. Summary (page 183)
  • 7. Other Class II Verbs (page 185)
    • 7.1.The Hiphil of ??? (page 185)
      • 7.1.1. General Characteristics (page 185)
      • 7.1.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 186)
      • 7.1.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 187)
      • 7.1.4. Problem Passages (page 188)
      • 7.1.5. Distinguishing Features (page 190)
    • 7.2. The Hiphil of ??? (page 190)
      • 7.2.1. General Characteristics (page 190)
      • 7.2.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 191)
      • 7.2.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical semantics of the Verb (page 193)
      • 7.2.4. Problem Passages (page 193)
      • 7.2.5. Distinguishing Features (page 194)
    • 7.3. The Hiphil of ??? (page 195)
      • 7.3.1. General Characteristics (page 195)
      • 7.3.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 196)
      • 7.3.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 198)
      • 7.3.4. Problem Passages (page 198)
      • 7.3.5. Distingishing Features (page 199)
    • 7.4. The Hiphil of ??? (page 200)
      • 7.4.1. General Characteristics (page 200)
      • 7.4.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 201)
      • 7.4.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 203)
      • 7.4.4. Problem Passages (page 203)
      • 7.4.5. Distinguishing Features (page 203)
    • 7.5. The Hiphil of ??? (page 204)
      • 7.5.1. General Characteristics (page 204)
      • 7.5.2. Argument-Structure Characteristics (page 204)
      • 7.5.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 205)
      • 7.5.4. Problem Passages (page 206)
      • 7.6.4. Distinguishing Features (page 209)
    • 7.6. The Hiphil and Hophal of ??? (page 209)
      • 7.6.1. General Characteristics (page 209)
      • 7.6.2. Argument Strucute Characteristics (page 210)
      • 7.6.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 211)
      • 7.6.4. Problem Passages (page 211)
      • 7.6.5. Distinguishing Features (page 213)
    • 7.7. The Hiphil of ??? (page 213)
      • 7.7.1. General Characteristics (page 213)
      • 7.7.2. Argument Strucute Characteristics (page 214)
      • 7.7.3. Additional Comments on the Lexical Semantics of the Verb (page 215)
      • 7.7.4. Problem Passages (page 215)
      • 7.7.5. Distinguishing Features (page 219)
    • 7.8. Summary of Class II Verbs of Leading (page 219)
      • 7.8.1. Similar Features (page 220)
      • 7.8.2. Distinguishing Features (page 220)
      • 7.8.3. Class I vs. Class II (page 221)
  • 8. Conclusions (page 223)
    • 8.1. Verb Behavior and Meaning (page 223)
    • 8.2. Distinguishing within the Verb Class (page 224)
    • 8.3. Text-Critical Problems (page 226)
    • 8.4. Hebrew Stem System (page 226)
    • 8.5. Avenues for Further Research (page 227)
  • Appendices (page 229)
    • Appendix A: Distinguishing Features of Class I Verbs (page 230)
    • Appendix B: Distinguishing Features of Class II Verbs (page 231)
    • Appendix C: Class I Verb Occurrences (page 232)
      • C.1 Introduction (page 232)
      • C. 2 (page 233)
      • C. 3 (page 234)
      • C. 4 (page 236)
      • C. 5 (page 238)
      • C. 6 (page 239)
      • C. 7 (page 240)
      • C. 8 (page 241)
      • C. 9 (page 242)
    • Appendix D: Class II Verb Occurrences (page 244)
      • D. 1 (page 244)
      • D. 2 (page 245)
      • D. 3 (page 252)
      • D. 4 (page 266)
      • D. 5 (page 277)
      • D. 6 (page 286)
      • D. 7 (page 288)
      • D. 8 (page 291)
      • D. 9 (page 294)
      • D. 10 (page 295)
      • D. 11 (page 298)
      • D. 12 (page 301)
      • D. 13 (page 302)
  • Bibliography (page 309)
  • Index (page 317)
  • Index of Scripture (page 319)
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