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The article rejects the argument that the Bible was not solely penned by Moses. He examines the evidence and presents his own to oppose it. He concludes that neither side of the argument can be proven.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-168-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 790
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 19
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-168-1
$34.00
$20.40

After Frederic Augustus Wolf’s Prolegomena to Homer questioned the existence of a single author, Wolf’s method began to be spread to other texts. Considering how the connection from Homer to the Iliad is like Moses to the Pentateuch, when Homer was questioned, so was Scripture. The author claims that the Bible has stronger evidence to challenge the break in authorship. Wolf’s argument would require a lack of writing in Moses’ time, but this is not true or at least cannot be proven. Even if Israelites had no written language when they entered Egypt, why could they not acquire it over those four hundred years? He engages in debate over which alphabet must have been used. He also denies that, because Hebrews were crude shepherds, they would have no use for writing. He concludes that there is ample evidence on both sides such that no conclusion is possible. Even if it were difficult to write, Moses had the best reasons to learn to do so to pen the Pentateuch. The author claims tools such as ink and skins were available to write with. Ultimately, the Pentateuch is untainted and written by Moses.

After Frederic Augustus Wolf’s Prolegomena to Homer questioned the existence of a single author, Wolf’s method began to be spread to other texts. Considering how the connection from Homer to the Iliad is like Moses to the Pentateuch, when Homer was questioned, so was Scripture. The author claims that the Bible has stronger evidence to challenge the break in authorship. Wolf’s argument would require a lack of writing in Moses’ time, but this is not true or at least cannot be proven. Even if Israelites had no written language when they entered Egypt, why could they not acquire it over those four hundred years? He engages in debate over which alphabet must have been used. He also denies that, because Hebrews were crude shepherds, they would have no use for writing. He concludes that there is ample evidence on both sides such that no conclusion is possible. Even if it were difficult to write, Moses had the best reasons to learn to do so to pen the Pentateuch. The author claims tools such as ink and skins were available to write with. Ultimately, the Pentateuch is untainted and written by Moses.

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  • ART. V.-Wolfs Anti-Homeric Theory, as applied to the Pentateuch (page 5)